A Slepyng Hound to Wake

A Slepyng Hound to Wake Sullivan has a new girlfriend a new apartment and a shelf load of troubles A bookscout sells him a book and is murdered later that night His neighbor seems to have a stalker And wherever he goes th

let the dog see the rabbit, Idioms and Phrases, Idioms let the dog see the rabbit let someone get on with work they are ready and waiting to do informal This phrase comes from greyhound racing where the dogs chase a mechanical rabbit around a track. English proverbs alphabetically by proverb Wikiquote Proverbs are popularly defined as short expressions of popular wisdom Efforts to improve on the popular definition have not led to a precise definition The wisdom is in the form of a general observation about the world or a bit of advice, sometimes nearly an attitude toward a situation Cliches Businessballs Cliches and expressions give us many wonderful figures of speech and words in the English language, as they evolve via use and mis use alike Many cliches and expressions and words have fascinating and surprising origins, and many popular assumptions about meanings and derivations are mistaken.

  • Title: A Slepyng Hound to Wake
  • Author: Vincent McCaffrey
  • ISBN: 9781931520263
  • Page: 232
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Sullivan has a new girlfriend, a new apartment, and a shelf load of troubles A bookscout sells him a book and is murdered later that night His neighbor seems to have a stalker And wherever he goes, there s a cop watching him To save those he loves, Sullivan has to save himself

    One thought on “A Slepyng Hound to Wake”

    1. I don't think I liked this one as much as the first in the series but it was pretty good. The reason I didn't like it as well is that the mystery was mostly way on the back burner while Henry ran around worrying about plagiarism and the death of brick and mortar bookstores, specifically the bookstore where he got his start and that is still owned by his friend Barbara.Also, there wasn't enough of Albert, Henry's "refuse management" friend and wise counsel. But, I did enjoy spending time with Hen [...]

    2. Yes, this is a mystery, and a good one, though it only seems to become one in the last fifty pages. The first part of the book is the set up, and rambles a bit, but it's an interesting ramble. Listening in on their conversations, the reader gets to know the quirky characters like old friends, and the author also takes us on a poignant exploration of the end of the era of independent bookstores. The characters were likeable, the mystery solid, the ending satisfying. Upon finishing the book, I wan [...]

    3. As someone who is deeply attached to the printed word (I worked in a bookstore for many years before I became a librarian) I identify strongly with a gloomy statement Henry makes rather late in the book (p.196)"The number of people who can read goes up, and the number of people who want to read goes down. The ones that do all read the same stuff. Any chain store can supply that crap" And that is why I hope Mr McCaffrey continues writing. It's not "the same stuff, " and I enjoy his work immensely [...]

    4. I'm not sure what I thought of this book. I had to make myself finish it, so it never really grabbed my interest, even though the elements in the story are among my favorites. The 'hero' is apparently some sort of magnet for any female of any age. That was really irritating by the end of the book and the 'mystery' felt like there weren't any clues for the reader and the author thought this was a good place to solve the murder, although we're not sure there was one. Very ambiguous. I won't bother [...]

    5. I skimmed through this one, since I was pretty sure it wouldn't be for me and I just wanted to give it a token effort since, after all, I did buy it. I didn't get on well with the first book though -- it left me feeling very frustrated at the waste of time -- and this one, I'm told, was written first.True to expectations, I didn't like this at all. There were just no hooks there for me -- even the love of books didn't get across to me. Meh.

    6. I think I enjoyed this more than the first. I found the first book to be dark and moody. In contrast, Hound 2 had humor and thoughtfulness and hope. I will agree with some of the other readers out there -- Henry's attractiveness to the opposite sex seemed almost viral, but that added to many humorous moments in the story.The dialogue between Henry and Barbara towards the end of the story was interesting. Where will the book business go next?

    7. This was the second in a series of "Hound" (as in book-hound) books. The author's notes says that it was actually the first one written. I was not surprised because there was much more lecturing about the state of bookstores, particularly those that carry older novels by once popular writers. Authors that still have a lot to say about being human.

    8. I really wanted to like this book because it's about booksellers and scouts, and the author used to own a very well known bookstore. As long as he was talking about books and the business, all was well. Unfortunately, the main character was a bore and a wimp, and the women were appalling. So I quit. Boo.

    9. 2nd in this English series about a book seller, his personal troubles but much info about books, the selling business, plagiarism etc. Haven't made up my mind if I like this series or not because they can be a little dry.

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