A World at Total War: Global Conflict and the Politics of Destruction, 1937 1945

A World at Total War Global Conflict and the Politics of Destruction Presenting the results of a fifth and final conference on the history of total war this volume is devoted to the Second World War which many scholars regard as the paradigmatic instance of total w

  • Title: A World at Total War: Global Conflict and the Politics of Destruction, 1937 1945
  • Author: Roger Chickering Stig F Bernd Greiner
  • ISBN: 9780521155137
  • Page: 250
  • Format: Paperback
  • Presenting the results of a fifth, and final, conference on the history of total war, this volume is devoted to the Second World War, which many scholars regard as the paradigmatic instance of total war In considering the validity of this proposition, the contributors address a broad range of analytical problems that this vast conflict posed in its European and Asian theaPresenting the results of a fifth, and final, conference on the history of total war, this volume is devoted to the Second World War, which many scholars regard as the paradigmatic instance of total war In considering the validity of this proposition, the contributors address a broad range of analytical problems that this vast conflict posed in its European and Asian theaters They analyze modes of combat, mobilization of economies and societies, occupation regimes, noncombatant vulnerability, and the legal and moral issues raised by mid twentieth century industrialized warfare.

    One thought on “A World at Total War: Global Conflict and the Politics of Destruction, 1937 1945”

    1. In his essay, Robert Messer makes two points that are worth pondering.First, the United States had only two atomic bombs in the Summer of 1945 but many stockpiles of poison gas. Marshall supported the use of gas on Japanese cities, but Truman, Stimson, and Byrnes had "other priorities and perspectives." (p. 300, fn 5.) If cities were legitimate strategic targets, why would Truman approve atomic bombs but not gas? Truman witnessed the effects of gas in World War I (p. 306). Was gas really any wor [...]

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