Japanese Animation: From Painted Scrolls to Pokemon

Japanese Animation From Painted Scrolls to Pokemon A sweeping journey through the history of Japanese animation tracing this cultural phenomenon from its origins in traditional art to the present day A dominant force in its home country since the

  • Title: Japanese Animation: From Painted Scrolls to Pokemon
  • Author: Brigitte Koyama-Richard
  • ISBN: 9782080301536
  • Page: 461
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A sweeping journey through the history of Japanese animation, tracing this cultural phenomenon from its origins in traditional art to the present day A dominant force in its home country since the 1970s, Japanese animation has become a global phenomenon in recent years But far from being a contemporary invention, anime draws on the same centuries old artistic traditionsA sweeping journey through the history of Japanese animation, tracing this cultural phenomenon from its origins in traditional art to the present day A dominant force in its home country since the 1970s, Japanese animation has become a global phenomenon in recent years But far from being a contemporary invention, anime draws on the same centuries old artistic traditions that form the basis of manga Widely disparaged when it first appeared in the West, today the real value of Japanese animation is recognized, and it has inspired international film directors Fairy tale, romance, adventure, fantasy, science fiction anime encompasses many genres and its creativity knows no bounds Brigitte Koyama Richard studies the evolution of Japanese animation through the centuries, retracing its history from painted scrolls to woodblock prints, to animated films, first in black and white, and then in color A number of prominent artists are showcased, including Tezuka Osamu, the godfather of anime, and Hayao Miyazaki, founder of the world renowned Studio Ghibli and creator of films such as Spirited Away the first anime film to win an Academy Award Illustrated with over 500 images, many rarely seen in the West, this book bridges the gap between art history and pop culture.

    One thought on “Japanese Animation: From Painted Scrolls to Pokemon”

    1. I have very mixed feelings about this book. On the plus side, it is beautiful; the illustrations are well chosen, well captioned and the print quality is extremely high (I've given an extra star for appearance!). The structure of the book, however, is another matter. By the end, I felt I had been reading a sixth former's project. The book has no real flow; the author does briefly cover the history of Japanese scrolls, as well as the development in Europe of the various devices to produce moving [...]

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