The Humanoid Touch

The Humanoid Touch HUMANOIDS Self directed robots invented to serve guard mankind With Folded Hands is a sf novelette by Jack Williamson His influence for this story was in the aftermath of WWII the atomi

  • Title: The Humanoid Touch
  • Author: Jack Williamson
  • ISBN: 9780030560521
  • Page: 480
  • Format: Hardcover
  • HUMANOIDS Self directed robots invented to serve guard mankind With Folded Hands is a 1947 sf novelette by Jack Williamson 1908 2006 His influence for this story was in the aftermath of WWII the atomic bombings of Japan his concern that some of the technological creations we had developed with the best intentions might have disastrous consequences iHUMANOIDS Self directed robots invented to serve guard mankind With Folded Hands is a 1947 sf novelette by Jack Williamson 1908 2006 His influence for this story was in the aftermath of WWII the atomic bombings of Japan his concern that some of the technological creations we had developed with the best intentions might have disastrous consequences in the long run The story was followed by a novel length rewrite, with a different setting inventor This, serialized as Searching Mind, was finally published as The Humanoids 1948 He followed with a sequel, The Humanoid Touch, published in 1980.

    One thought on “The Humanoid Touch”

    1. Thirty years after publishing ‘The Humanoids’, Williamson finally produced this sequel. In the original novel humans create an advanced race of machines to save mankind from itself, but the robots go too far. They create worlds where humans can do nothing for themselves, where every possible threat to life and limb is extinguished, limiting humans to nothing more than animals in a gilded cage, free to pursue any dream they choose, as long as the risk is nonexistent.In ‘The Humanoid Touch [...]

    2. More engaging than the first, and much less sexist. Still, I recommend only the short story, With Folded Hands. The two books don't really add anything, imo.

    3. In Jack Williamson's classic short story "With Folded Hands" (1947), the inventor of the Humanoids--sleek black robots whose credo is "To Serve And Obey, And Guard Men From Harm," even if that means stifling mankind's freedoms--makes an unsuccessful attempt to destroy the computer plexus on planet Wing IV that is keeping the many millions of units functioning. In the author's classic sequel, the novel "The Humanoids" (1949), another unsuccessful stab is made, 90 years later, by a "rhodomagnetics [...]

    4. This was a great book - really liked it a lot. Many of the ideas and some of the topics were picked up by James Cameron's 'Avatar' - I am sure about it. Scary too, as the humanoids cannot be overcome - it has been a lost struggle from the very beginning.A easy read but with surprising depth Had read "The Humanoids" many years ago, but this was before I started my book diary. My copy of "The Humanoids" should still be on my bookshelf, and I should re-read it.

    5. Finally got around to reading this, and not bad, not bad at all. Writing is clear, concise, and moves the story along at a brisk pace with a few twists and turns, though little in the way of deep characterisation. The novel stands the test of time well. Humanoid robots, programmed to care for humans too much end up protecting humans to the point of smothering ambition and creativity. A scientist and a few associates attempt to overcome but are prevented and become believers. Not bad.

    6. A veces ocurre que leo alguna novela de ciencia ficción de los 50 y la encuentro tonta o aburrida, o sin sentido. Esos casos se dan cuando una novela está escrita pensando en un público coetáneo y claro, cuando envejece y el público es otro la novela no encaja. Eso me pasó por ejemplo con el hombre demolido. Pero esta no es de esas. Esta es un ejemplo de esas novelas que envejecen como el buen vino. Me encanta cómo tratan el tema de los robots, me encanta el factor poderes psiónicos muy [...]

    7. This novel, sequel to Williamson's justifiably classic novel The Humanoids, takes place about one thousand years from now. A small remnant of humanity has fled to a pair of planets orbiting a binary star, in order to get away from robotic servants called humanoids.What's so awful about robotic servants whose only purpose is to serve Man, and protect him from harm? Aside from the fact that they number in the trillions and are spreading throughout the galaxy, they gently, but firmly, insist on doi [...]

    8. Written 30 years after the author wrote the first book, "The Humanoids", to which this one is a sequel, Williamson's humanoid robots are as controlling and dreaded as ever but with some new twists. Set on different planets where the remnants of free humanity have taken refuge, the humanoids finally catch up with them, a thousand years or so later. Again, a page turner.

    9. I thought that this book was outstanding for it's technical content and fantasy sequences. I hate to read series books out of order, but I found this one at a thrift store for really cheap so I could not pass it up. If you like to read Asimov, you will like this too. Looking for the first book now.

    10. i read this quite some time ago. a classic in the robotic genre. mankind creates robots smart enough to revolt and win. and they are not satisfied until they rid the galaxy of humans. fear the future.

    11. Not having done the homework, I read this sequel to The Humanoids without having read its predecessor. Consequently, I got probably did not appreciate this tale of overly-helpful and protective robots as much as I might have.

    12. Dragged on a bit for me compared to the first book, but still really enjoyed. I guess I'd say the ending is a bit more upbeat than the first.

    13. One of his strongest works, showing what he was capable of and his mastery of the language. Jack weaves a strong tale, and it's ann easy read. But there are deep questions here, if you look for them.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *