The Glad River

The Glad River No one in Claughton County ever understood why Doops Momber refused to be baptized his people were all good Baptists And no one in Cummings Mississippi knew that Kingston Smylie s daddy was really h

  • Title: The Glad River
  • Author: Will D. Campbell
  • ISBN: 9781573124454
  • Page: 444
  • Format: Paperback
  • No one in Claughton County ever understood why Doops Momber refused to be baptized his people were all good Baptists And no one in Cummings, Mississippi, knew that Kingston Smylie s daddy was really his granddaddy and that Kingston wasn t really white And at Camp Polk, no one knew anything at all about Fordache Arceneau because he spoke only Cajun They met in basic traNo one in Claughton County ever understood why Doops Momber refused to be baptized his people were all good Baptists And no one in Cummings, Mississippi, knew that Kingston Smylie s daddy was really his granddaddy and that Kingston wasn t really white And at Camp Polk, no one knew anything at all about Fordache Arceneau because he spoke only Cajun They met in basic training Green kids who d always felt themselves to be outsiders, they formed a community of three They called it the neighborhood After seeing action together at Guadalcanal, the three friends went back to the lives they d each known, but they went on meeting regularly, keeping up the neighborhood Their lives were untroubled, until the day Fordache found himself accused of murder, on trial for his life And in a small Southern courtroom in the autumn of 1952, the neighborhood bound by love and based on understanding faced its ultimate test The Glad River is a deeply affecting novel Grounded in a particular place and time, its themes are, nonetheless, universal A novel that probes the limits of religion and the state, it is also the work of a master storyteller and civil rights activist whose works are considered a treasure of modern Southern literature Contains strong language, may not be suitable for young readers.

    One thought on “The Glad River”

    1. Perhaps my favorite all-time read is Brother to a Dragonfly by Will Campbell. When I learned of his recent death, I decided to read The Glad River, and I'm very, very glad I did. It is the tale of three misfits--Droops, Model T and Kingston--Southern boys who served in World War II together and then maintained and deepened their "community" thereafter. Set mainly in the South, the story depicts the hard consequences suffered by living lives according to a rock bottom, hard scrabble faith anchore [...]

    2. Will Campbell is an amazing storyteller. This book (first published in 1982 and recently re-issued by Smyth & Helwys) is about "community" and "neighborhood." It could not be more timely for it speaks to the very issues we wrestle with today - us vs. them, who is "in" and who is "out," racism, justice, faith, religion, and the bonds that knit people together. This is not easy reading for it will make you think, and perhaps, make you rethink your theology and your politics.

    3. I'm new to Will Campbell but I'm impressed. Anyone with pretensions to being a Baptist who has not already read this novel should do so during the current election cycle. The story centers on Doops Momber, a born-and-bred Baptist in pre- and post-World War II Mississippi who refuses to be baptized until, in his own language, he can find a real Baptist to do it. Doops' problem is that he's been reading Anabaptist history and discovered things that mattered to that fellowship. I wish I could teach [...]

    4. I'm agnostic and I didn't read this book because it's about Baptists. I read it because I found it in a box in my parents' garage and the dust jacket mentioned World War II. This story is so very much more than that. It's a definition of a country during the earliest decades of the 20th century.Doops, Kingston, and Model T are best friends from different worlds and, at the same time, from the same world. They meet under the harshest of circumstances, or so they think, and they part under the mos [...]

    5. “Or maybe the difference between a community and a country is that a community has a soul and a country doesn’t. Because God created the community and man created the country. Some king sees all these communities around and says, ‘Hoboy! Let’s put ‘em all together and rule over ‘em.’ And then he promptly fucks it up.”

    6. I give "The Glad River" five out of five or six out of six, maybe even seven out of seven. It's the novel equivalent of Campbell's wonderful nonfiction book, "Brother to a Dragonfly." This reprint of the book will add to its fame.

    7. One of the best stories I have ever read. If you don't know Will Campbell, who recently died and is better known for his book Brother to a Dragonfly, he is definitely worth reading. He has much to say and says it well.

    8. Very thought provoking look at religion. A different perspective on the Christ figure and the giving of an innocent life.

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