The Black Stork: Eugenics and the Death of "Defective" Babies in American Medicine and Motion Pictures since 1915

The Black Stork Eugenics and the Death of Defective Babies in American Medicine and Motion Pictures since In the late s Dr Harry J Haiselden a prominent Chicago surgeon electrified the nation by allowing the deaths of at least six infant s he diagnosed as defectives Martin Pernick tells this captiv

  • Title: The Black Stork: Eugenics and the Death of "Defective" Babies in American Medicine and Motion Pictures since 1915
  • Author: Martin S. Pernick
  • ISBN: 9780195077315
  • Page: 184
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In the late 1910s, Dr Harry J Haiselden, a prominent Chicago surgeon, electrified the nation by allowing the deaths of at least six infant s he diagnosed as defectives Martin Pernick tells this captivating story uncovering forgotten sources and long lost motion pictures in order to show how efforts to improve human heredity eugenics became linked with mercy killinIn the late 1910s, Dr Harry J Haiselden, a prominent Chicago surgeon, electrified the nation by allowing the deaths of at least six infant s he diagnosed as defectives Martin Pernick tells this captivating story uncovering forgotten sources and long lost motion pictures in order to show how efforts to improve human heredity eugenics became linked with mercy killing, as well as with race, class, gender and eth nicity.

    One thought on “The Black Stork: Eugenics and the Death of "Defective" Babies in American Medicine and Motion Pictures since 1915”

    1. This is a disturbing but very interesting book. Pernick appears to grasp completely the complexity of the subject, is mindful of the differences in culture and attitudes between 1915 and 2010, and seems comfortable with the limits of the information available to him, rather than over-speculating as some writers seem tempted to do when trying to write about an interesting topic with little available research material.

    2. Read this in manuscript before it was published, as the author was my professor. Excellent discussion of eugenics, both from a medical, historical, and film perspective.

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