Self-Portrait with Expletives

Self Portrait with Expletives I swear Kevin Clark s Self Portrait with Expletives is the book I ve have been waiting to read the book in which the past and present are not strangers but lovers Clark s ecstatic poems time travel w

  • Title: Self-Portrait with Expletives
  • Author: Kevin Clark
  • ISBN: 9780807136454
  • Page: 184
  • Format: Paperback
  • I swear Kevin Clark s Self Portrait with Expletives is the book I ve have been waiting to read the book in which the past and present are not strangers, but lovers Clark s ecstatic poems time travel with alacrity on their quest for transformation and song Intimate, hilarious, attentive, political, Self Portrait with Expletives is a mature, commanding book by a poet c I swear Kevin Clark s Self Portrait with Expletives is the book I ve have been waiting to read the book in which the past and present are not strangers, but lovers Clark s ecstatic poems time travel with alacrity on their quest for transformation and song Intimate, hilarious, attentive, political, Self Portrait with Expletives is a mature, commanding book by a poet confident in his craft It s also a book with a wide and wonderful boyish grin Denise Duhamel From these pages flows a warm and breathy voice that sings up the Tuscan countryside but also traffics in the quiddities of hardscrabble Americana beers drunk, cars wrecked, guns fired, songs sung, lovers kissed and missed It s as though there s nothing this voice can t say it s personal, provocative, and I want to hear it again and again David Kirby

    One thought on “Self-Portrait with Expletives”

    1. I have not yet read Clark's first book, In the Evening of No Warning . This second book, recommended by a friend, surprised and pleased me in its valuing the mode of narrative-meditation as it slides over into the local-descriptive. The surprise is why I give it five stars; I'm very keen in what pleases me. Were the first book as pleasing as the second, perhaps I'd give the first the five, and the second four: it's not every book, after all, that, as Berryman would say, adds to the stock of avai [...]

    2. Clark is wordy. That, I think, is the most concise that I can be. Sure many of his poems are long, but I don’t really mind that. He’s wordy. Nouns everywhere. That I mind.Poems like his “Stephen Hawking” one on page 33 are remarkably interesting, but so drowned out by nouns and things and objects with a few adjectives thrown in before them that it becomes hard to read, hard to parse through, and hard to appreciate. Sure, throwing in a bunch of words may seem like good diction, but a good [...]

    3. This book won the Pleiades Press 2010 prize. He has a rich history with many of the poetic greats, such as James Dickey, who appear in an intimate voice. Most of the book is a wild & wooly ride through his early years coming to manhood with some of his teaching experiences. From the opening poem "Eight Hours in the Nixon Era" we are started off through his world in a place and time with lots of characters from his history. Lots of self-definition and hippie days gone by. It is a free spirite [...]

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