Beneath the Sands of Egypt: Adventures of an Unconventional Archaeologist

Beneath the Sands of Egypt Adventures of an Unconventional Archaeologist Donald Ryan is a rare bird a field archaeologist who can write with verve and immediacy I heartily recommend his book to all Egyptology buffs Barbara Mertz a k a Elizabeth Peters author of Temples

  • Title: Beneath the Sands of Egypt: Adventures of an Unconventional Archaeologist
  • Author: Donald P. Ryan
  • ISBN: 9780061732829
  • Page: 482
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Donald Ryan is a rare bird a field archaeologist who can write with verve and immediacy I heartily recommend his book to all Egyptology buffs Barbara Mertz a.k.a Elizabeth Peters , author of Temples, Tombs, and Hieroglyphs A real life Indiana Jones, Donald P Ryan, Ph.D offers a breathtaking personal account of his adventures in archaeology in Beneath the Sands Donald Ryan is a rare bird a field archaeologist who can write with verve and immediacy I heartily recommend his book to all Egyptology buffs Barbara Mertz a.k.a Elizabeth Peters , author of Temples, Tombs, and Hieroglyphs A real life Indiana Jones, Donald P Ryan, Ph.D offers a breathtaking personal account of his adventures in archaeology in Beneath the Sands of Egypt Fans of The Lost City of Z will thrill to the exploits of this unconventional archaeologist as he retrieves the remains of Egypt s past including his breakthrough discovery in the Valley of the Kings of Egypt s famous female pharaoh, Hatshepsut.

    One thought on “Beneath the Sands of Egypt: Adventures of an Unconventional Archaeologist”

    1. Donald Ryan wrote a fun yet sometime confusing biography of his professional archeological career This book gives a great historical background of archeological history in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt, famous and no famous archeologists, practices and new scientific discoveries.Dr. Ryan is a passionate and intelligent go getter that leans towards arrogance. His writing style is inviting but jumps around, as many biographys do. He also switches location from paragraph to paragraph leaving you [...]

    2. A very enjoyable memoir of an archaeologist. As the sub-title indicates he is an "unconventional" archaeologist and this book goes into some of the details of his unusual career path from rock-climbing into tomb-exploration in Egypt. The chapters dealing with his explorations in Egypt were (to me, anyway) the most interesting. His association with Thor Heyerdahl was quite interesting as well. The book made me want to learn more about the Valley of the Kings and the history of its exploration. Th [...]

    3. A pleasant, slight, rather self-indulgent memoir. There is no index, making it useless for research or reference. Ryan offers some interesting anecdotes about his personal experiences in the field, but I suspect most of the hard archaeological data can be found elsewhere. There are long digressions on Belzoni and excavator David Hogarth, and a sketch of the author's relationship with Thor Heyerdahl. Minor but annoying errors (can HarperCollins not afford editors?) are scattered through the book, [...]

    4. I have mixed feelings about this book. It had some interesting narrative and revealed a good deal about the actual physical work of archeology. However, this is mostly a somewhat self-indulgent memoir of an unusual scholar. He spent a lot of tie as a rock climber and guide, couldn’t get along at the U of Washington and wound up educated at some second rate places. In spite of that he worked hard and conscientiously on digs in Egypt and made some discoveries. He was tapped by BBC for a document [...]

    5. A little more auto-biographical than what I was expecting but none-the-less a solid read. I've always been fascinated with archaelogy and ancient Egypt, so reading something from the hands that have actually done it was entertaining for me. He even manages to make reading about rope engaging. Recommended if you, like me are interested in Ancient Egyptian Archaeology

    6. ExplorationThis is essentially an autobiography of an Egyptologist who has excavated many sites in the ancient country. I unfortunately do not possess the background or the knowledge to really appreciate this book, but some of it was interesting.

    7. Beneath the Sands of Egypt is more than a memoir. It touches on Egyptian and archaeological history, highlighting pioneers in the industry and important finds already uncovered. Dr. Ryan also presents a cautionary tale about the field, the risks required to be successful, and the demanding physical and scholarly work required. Rather than becoming a lecture, Dr. Ryan presents his story with flair, highlighting the pros and cons of his chosen profession with an ardor that does not exist in most p [...]

    8. I read this book to help me with research, hoping it would give me further insight into an archaeologist's life while on a dig. The passages pertaining to expeditions were interesting and helpful, but became repetitive after a while. The book focused more on the courage and daring exploits of the author, which eventually began to irritate me as I'm not a fan of the egotistical. I was a bit miffed by a section of the book which described the author's experience of filming a documentary with the B [...]

    9. The title of this book resonated with me greatly so I decided to buy the book and read it. I was not under any false ideas of the book's content as it was quite clear on the back cover "e extraordinary story of a man who has always embraced adventure whenever - and wherever - he finds it." In case I may have still been confused about the books content, the front cover has the words"Adventures of an Unconventional Archaeologist". So for me, this meant that should the reader choose to, they can go [...]

    10. This book is part memoir, part travel book, and part history of archaeology; as such, it never really hits stride in any of its genres. The part I enjoyed most was the history of archaeology. I really liked his comments comparing today’s archaeological methods with that of the 18th and early 19th century and the stories of people like Belzoni, Howard Carter, etc. I also liked that Ryan found interest in the mundane and “leftover” bits of archaeology, such as his willingness to study how ro [...]

    11. Archaeology and Egyptology are subjects that I did not know much about but this book made me want to learn more. It is the account of episodes in the life of what appears to be a rather mundane archaeologist without any splashy finds or lurid tales to tell but it was written well enough to keep me interested. This was another of those books that I enjoy where the author found a good balance between telling the surface story and mixing in enough background information to give it some perspective [...]

    12. This one turned out to be different than I had expected. It's more about Donald Ryan's life in archaeology than about Egypt as the title may imply. Don't let that steer you away from this book. It's good, and one that I recommend very much to anyone who is interested in the subject. Longer review can be found here:epinions/review/Donald

    13. Fun, fast read. Describes the hard scrabble life of an archaeologist as he scrambles to find funding for his next project. He is part wild child, part renaissance man. I was rooting for him all the way despite setbacks. He get some awesome opportunities, any one of which I would love to experience. And he is just crazy enough to keep the story interesting.

    14. I think this would be a great book for someone trying to map out a possible career in archaeology. I have long since moved past that dream, so it was a less effective treatment of the subject than I prefer at this moment in my life. I would recommend this book for others with a serious interest in the field, but not the general reader.

    15. The author gets a little cheesy sometimes, often pointedly writing about his self-identified witty "one-liners" that he spouts to Egyptians, officials, etc. However, when he talks about his actual excavations, it is excellent. It is like I went to Egypt with my kooky college professor.

    16. I have always been fascinated by archaeology so this memoir was very interesting to me. I loved the chapters about excavations and wished the entire book had been about them. I found some parts dry and a little boring but enjoying the author's point of view.

    17. Interesting life and adventures. He was not a smooth author, and I often wondered where on earth the rest of his family was (ah yes, for this I did not pursue archaeology) but he has led an interesting life.

    18. I enjoyed this book a lot. In terms of my interest in archaeology I'm a bit more interested in the American Southwest, primarily Anasazi, but this was an engaging, entertaining, and educational book. Recommended.

    19. The subject matter was fascinating, but the writing was just too pedestrian to flow. Maybe I was too distracted by life, but it is rare for me to take as long to finish a book as I did! I had a hard time maintaining interest despite the superb content.

    20. i enjoyed this book. It is a memoir of an archeologist and Egyptologist. It provides a nice introduction to archeology and Egyptology. The author has a very readable style and has had a interesting life so far.

    21. Well, it was enjoyable, but not all that informative. I expected a lot more, especially out of his travails in Egypt. But, what can one do?

    22. Only vaguely interesting. Seemed more about the vast skills the author brought to archeology rather than about archaeology disappointing for me.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *