The Lord and the General Din of the World: Poems

The Lord and the General Din of the World Poems Jane Mead was educated at Vassar College Syracuse University and the University of Iowa Writers Workshop and has taught at several schools in the San Francisco Bay area at Colby College and in the

  • Title: The Lord and the General Din of the World: Poems
  • Author: Jane Mead Philip Levine
  • ISBN: 9780964115118
  • Page: 472
  • Format: Paperback
  • Jane Mead was educated at Vassar College, Syracuse University, and the University of Iowa Writers Workshop and has taught at several schools in the San Francisco Bay area, at Colby College, and in the Iowa Summer Writing Festival, In 1991, State Street Press published her long poem A Truck Marked Flammable as a chapbook Her individual poems have been widely published iJane Mead was educated at Vassar College, Syracuse University, and the University of Iowa Writers Workshop and has taught at several schools in the San Francisco Bay area, at Colby College, and in the Iowa Summer Writing Festival, In 1991, State Street Press published her long poem A Truck Marked Flammable as a chapbook Her individual poems have been widely published in such places as The New York Times, Best American Poetry of 1990, American Poetry Review, The Virginia Quarterly, Ploughshares, and The Antioch Review In 1992, she received a Whiting Writers Award Mead s poems lay bare a pathology that evidences the world and the self as illness and cure, where language bears the hellish and the holy fruit of its culture Mead unsettles me And I m grateful American Book Review Waiting for redemption from on high is a futile hope, and from that sudden understanding comes the animating imagination that carries these poems along They read with an ease exceptional in poetry today, and at times with a playfulness akin to some of Roethke s last books Rain Taxi Jane Mead Poet Author of what may be the best book of poems for 1996 The Lord and the General Din of the World The Bloomsbury Review The Lord and the General Din of the World, spoken in an intensely open voice suggests that the only stable existential presence can be created in the language of art But at every turn the relationship between language and identity is questioned The Journal These poems may change your view of what has meaning in the madness of American culture Such poetry could easily become tediously clinical or unbearably despairing, as so many poems on the subject are In fact, Mead never lets the reader off easy the unearned hope or resolutions She does reveal, however, possibilities for redemption Small Press Review These are not poems to be read silently, in a comfortable corner or chair Mead s poems enriched my appreciation of words and image and life in general Hodge Podge Poetry

    One thought on “The Lord and the General Din of the World: Poems”

    1. Re-reading The Lord and General Din of the World, I'm conflicted in all the normal ways, as Jane Mead has been my warm and friendly acquaintance in the art form of poetry almost since the beginning of my writing it, when I sat across the table from her in a Jorie Graham seminar at Iowa on the dramatic monologue. When in 1996 this book first appeared (ten years after that seminar), I was moved by the soulful doggedness in Mead's language, the way her poems moved away from and toward words' rich s [...]

    2. It's always a pleasure to return to books, and to find that your new reading doesn't come close to the original reading you had for the book. I can vaguely remember the first time I read General Din, and trying very hard to discover a biography lurking somewhere behind the poems. I felt their lyric voice emerged from a pained silence, and I found pleasure in the quiet voice that was the result. On reading it this time, I can see there is a greater consideration of truth as a necessarily self-fas [...]

    3. The first line of the first poem: "Jesus, I am cruelly lonely" sets the tone for the emotional depth of this book. The vulnerability of the speaker in these poems is paralleled by Mead's imagery.

    4. Not my jam-- got a little bored. The first section was the most interesting with lots of drug and family drama, accompanied by the requisite guilt, doubt, horror, anger. Some lovely, lovely lines there.

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