Under in the Mere

Under in the Mere What damosel is this What damosel is this Perhaps I am nothing but a white arm Perhaps the body which is me diffuses at the water s surface into nothing but light light and wetness and blue Maybe I a

  • Title: Under in the Mere
  • Author: Catherynne M. Valente James A. Owen Jeremy Owen
  • ISBN: 9780981743714
  • Page: 201
  • Format: Paperback
  • What damosel is this What damosel is this Perhaps I am nothing but a white arm Perhaps the body which is me diffuses at the water s surface into nothing but light, light and wetness and blue Maybe I am nothing but samite, pregnant with silver, and out of those sleeves come endless swords, dropping like lakelight from my hems Will you come down to me and discover if myWhat damosel is this What damosel is this Perhaps I am nothing but a white arm Perhaps the body which is me diffuses at the water s surface into nothing but light, light and wetness and blue Maybe I am nothing but samite, pregnant with silver, and out of those sleeves come endless swords, dropping like lakelight from my hems Will you come down to me and discover if my body continues below the rippling I thought not So begins the second release from the Electrum Novella Series, Under in the Mere, which takes Arthurian legend to the furthest limits of the imagination Incantatory, labrynthine, and both playful and heartbreaking, Under in the Mere is a major new work from one of America s premier writers of fantasy.With full interior illustrations from renowned fantasy artist James Owen and Jeremy Owen.

    One thought on “Under in the Mere”

    1. Catherynne Valente's take on Arthurian myths are very distinctively hers. I could've picked any extract from it and tell it was hers. She brings her distinctive style to my most beloved legends -- and sometimes I find the result interesting, and sometimes not. The idea of Morgan being Arthur's true love interested me most, since I wrote an essay on Guinevere which of necessity examined Morgan's role in the legends as well. I was most intrigued by her version of Kay, though, but of course I'm wri [...]

    2. Prose is to texts as abstract is to paintings. By definition, multiple interpretations are not only possible but achieved. I had previously thought my appreciation for prose was not. Such subjectivity could never matter. Yet it is all that matters, demonstrated by Mr. Island, as the atom comprises the universe, and without it, it would be not. The Informal may warrant being synonymous with the Senior. Ambiguity may be either worthless, time-wasting nonsense, or the best dream that I have ever ha [...]

    3. don't remember when i read this, probably 2008 or 2009 maybe regardless, it's Catherynne M. Valente so it was obviously amazing i don't know where she gets her writing style, but it is uniquely incredible at times, in her short stories, it can overtake the plot, but in her novellas and novels it works magically must read, hard to find

    4. Catherynne Valente’s novella Under in the Mere is about as inaccessible a book as I’ve read in some time. That doesn’t mean I’m not recommending it, but it’s fair warning to any who attempt it. Under in the Mere is a poetic, surrealistic “retelling” of several Arthurian tales (a mix of the better and lesser known ones), although “retelling” is really far too pedestrian and prosaic a term for Valente’s dense, imagistic and poetic language here, and far too limiting with regard [...]

    5. Arthurian legend meets the California coastline, and magic ensues. This book, more tone poem than novel, is a reimagining of the tales of Camelot told in first person from eleven points of view. This is not a book to be gulped down, but one in which to immerse. The language is beautiful and evocative, metaphor that will challenge and enlighten.

    6. I thought I had difficulty putting Tithe in a mental box, and then I read this. I'm not even going to TRY to box it.As best as I can describe it, the book is a collection of short stories, each narrated by a character in the court of King Arthur. (Guenevere doesn't get to talk, and neither does the king.) And if you open up the book when Lancelot is talking, you know the difference between him and the Green Knight. The voices are vividly different.I say narrated, but that's not right. It's almos [...]

    7. Here we explore the deep confessions of those ladies and knights. Of the Lady in the Lake, whose arm seems so much more important than the rest of her body. Of the Green Knight. Of Balin and Balan. Of Galahad. Of Morgan Le Fey. So many. So many. We are like untrained counselors who can only listen as these Arthurian patients whisper and scream their hearts out to us. They plop them right in our laps and don't expect a thing from us. There is no rhyme or reason. Only the poetry of emptying their [...]

    8. I have been looking for a Kindle copy of Under The Mere since the moment I heard there was a Cat version of Arthur. I have been an Arthurian buff since I was wee thing, and I have been a massive fan of Cat since the moment I discovered her. Hear there was a crosshatch between the two maybe be long desperately for it. Finally, I got to cross it off, and I have to say I deeply loved getting to ready this. Dissolving into the lake of all of it, glorious and descriptive and enchanting. I think that [...]

    9. Lyrical, just enough to present you with the kind of dreamscape you can comprehend. This is a book that requires prior knowledge of Arthuriana, and not just passing familiarity; it's also aided by a knowledge of tarot (for the illustrations). I got a passing grasp on it, but like a dreamscape, it slithers through your fingers, and you're left hoping you can dream it again sometime.

    10. This book makes me wish that I was still in college, and taking a class on Arthuriana - and I mean that in the best way. I don't know nearly enough about the legends of Arthur to really understand and appreciate what Cat's doing here, but Cat's language and storytelling ability are still amazing.

    11. I love most of what I've read by Valente, but just couldn't get into this book. Most of the chapters seem like they have great personal significance to the author, but not to me. I feel like I've failed as a reader

    12. Holy dense lyrical prose, Batman!I'mt sure what that was. It was beautiful. It was evocative. It was mesmerizing. It wasa thing.

    13. absolutely beautiful. lush, surreal, haunting, spiritual, poetic occult treatise on the Arthurian legend.

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