Hergé: The Man Who Created Tintin

Herg The Man Who Created Tintin One of the most beloved characters in all of comics Tintin won an enormous international following Translated into dozens of languages Tintin s adventures have sold millions of copies and Steven Sp

  • Title: Hergé: The Man Who Created Tintin
  • Author: Pierre Assouline Charles Ruas
  • ISBN: 9780195397598
  • Page: 220
  • Format: Hardcover
  • One of the most beloved characters in all of comics, Tintin won an enormous international following Translated into dozens of languages, Tintin s adventures have sold millions of copies, and Steven Spielberg is presently adapting the stories for the big screen Yet, despite Tintin s enduring popularity, Americans know almost nothing about his gifted creator, Georges Remi One of the most beloved characters in all of comics, Tintin won an enormous international following Translated into dozens of languages, Tintin s adventures have sold millions of copies, and Steven Spielberg is presently adapting the stories for the big screen Yet, despite Tintin s enduring popularity, Americans know almost nothing about his gifted creator, Georges Remi better known as Herge Offering a captivating portrait of a man who revolutionized the art of comics, this is the first full biography of Herge available for an English speaking audience Born in Brussels in 1907, Herge began his career as a cub reporter, a profession he gave to his teenaged, world traveling hero But whereas Tintin was fully formed, clear headed, and positive, Assouline notes, his inventor was complex, contradictory, inscrutable For all his huge success achieved with almost no formal training Herge would say unassumingly of his art, I was just happy drawing little guys, that s all Granted unprecedented access to thousands of the cartoonist s unpublished letters, Assouline gets behind the genial public mask to take full measure of Herge s life and art and the fascinating ways in which the two intertwine Neither sugarcoating nor sensationalizing his subject, he meticulously probes such controversial issues as Herge s support for Belgian imperialism in the Congo and his alleged collaboration with the Nazis He also analyzes the underpinnings of Tintin how the conception of the character as an asexual adventurer reflected Herge s appreciation for the Boy Scouts organization as well as his Catholic mentor s anti Soviet ideology and relates the comic strip to Herge s own place within the Belgian middle class A profound influence on a generation of artists such as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, the elusive figure of Herge comes to life in this illuminating biography a deeply nuanced account that unveils the man and his career as never before.

    One thought on “Hergé: The Man Who Created Tintin”

    1. The 1920’s to 1960’s has been a time period that has been analyzed to death. Whether it’s through a historic perspective, politics, equality, science, technology, etc, etc; it is a time period that gets a lot of scrutiny. This is mostly due to the Second World War and the holocaust. A horrific and barbarous event that sadly hasn’t stopped people from carrying hate onward to new generations. Yet when we look at this time period, we often only look from historic moments or famous people(s) [...]

    2. I sought this out because I wanted to know how the mind that created Tintin worked. Unfortunately, this book suffers from poor translation, bad enough that sometimes I didn't understand what a given sentence even meant. Maybe Assouline's original text is great, but it's hard to tell. This is also a book that definitely needs illustrations, and there isn't a single one.The sections about Hergé's activities around the Second World War are the strongest and came closest to providing genuine insigh [...]

    3. As someone who enjoyed the Tintin stories, it was nice to get some context about how each of his stories were created, but on the whole it wasn't a very good book. Half of the last chapter is devoted to reciting revisions Herge made to a previous book about himself - I'm sure there's some sort of irony in that. As a piece of critical non-fiction it is lacking - the vast majority of references for this work come from Herge himself and the author often makes unsubstantiated inferences. It would ha [...]

    4. More than just a biography of Georges Remi (Herge), Assouline has also written a book that's a window into pre- and post-WWII Belgium: the context in which Herge created Tintin.Relying on the Herge Foundation archives, Assouline explores the man and his life's work (Herge's personal life, compared to that of his creation, was turbulent) but also the Belgian publishing industry for children's books and periodicals.

    5. I learned things I was glad to learn about Hergé but this is a disaster of a book.Seems to have been translated by a robot and edited by a house cat, both locked in a room with no access to outside information, and neither of whom have any familiarity with or interest in the subject matter.Maybe it's good in French (much of it is more transliterated than translated, so it flips the Francophone brainswitch anyway), and without the parts that were abridged.

    6. I am not a big fan of biographies, but I was curious to learn something about the creator of Tintin. I have always been a big fan of Tintin, Snowy, Captain Haddock, having learned about them and read the stories in French class at a young age. And now, having read this biography of their creator, I struggle with the question of just how much one can divorce the "creator" from the "created." And, how much one must do so in order to continue loving the created. Herge, the man, turns out to be less [...]

    7. Being a big Tintin fan, I had to borrow this biography of the mysterious Herge after seeing it at the library out of the corner of my eye. In a way, it's surprising to see so many negative comments about this book; in fact, I didn't even realize it was a translation. Then again, it seems only fitting that biographies of Herge be written in French first, just as his Tintin stories were. But it is the content that makes this biography worthwhile (and to me, cancels out the other errors which I fin [...]

    8. If you love Tintin (like I do), you should read this book! It's an excellent look at Herge, both as an artist and as a man. He had his imperfections in both areas, but it's great to know more about him. Also, see Spielberg's Tintin movie if you haven't; I loved it!

    9. This book's a real shame, because the author's somehow managed to make an interesting person (in Hergé) appear dull. A more systematic way of recalling events past - i.e. rigorously chronological - would have suited the retelling of Hergé's life.

    10. Interesting more for its subject than for its style, this exploration of Herge's life by French top biographer Assouline is completist, and does not shy away from the author's darker side; but is ultimately too long-winded and pleased with itself.

    11. It's really good. I'm glad to have more details regarding the world around Herge when he was writing these stories I love so much.

    12. Not that great. As far as biographies go, it was fairly by the numbers. To factual, not anecdotal enough.

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