The Last Landscape

The Last Landscape The remaining corner of an old farm unclaimed by developers The brook squeezed between housing plans Abandoned railroad lines The stand of woods along an expanded highway These are the outposts of wh

  • Title: The Last Landscape
  • Author: William H. Whyte
  • ISBN: 9780812217995
  • Page: 445
  • Format: Paperback
  • The remaining corner of an old farm, unclaimed by developers The brook squeezed between housing plans Abandoned railroad lines The stand of woods along an expanded highway These are the outposts of what was once a larger pattern of forests and farms, the last landscape According to William H Whyte, the place to work out the problems of our metropolitan areas is witThe remaining corner of an old farm, unclaimed by developers The brook squeezed between housing plans Abandoned railroad lines The stand of woods along an expanded highway These are the outposts of what was once a larger pattern of forests and farms, the last landscape According to William H Whyte, the place to work out the problems of our metropolitan areas is within those areas, not outside them The age of unchecked expansion without consequence is over, but where there is waste and neglect there is opportunity Our cities and suburbs are not jammed they just look that way There are in fact plenty of ways to use this existing space to the benefit of the community, and The Last Landscape provides a practical and timeless framework for making informed decisions about its use.Called the best study available on the problems of open space by the New York Times when it first appeared in 1968, The Last Landscape introduced many cornerstone ideas for land conservation, urging all of us to make better use of the land that has survived amid suburban sprawl Whyte s pioneering work on easements led to the passage of major open space statutes in many states, and his argument for using and linking green spaces, however small the areas may be, is a recommendation that has currency today than ever before.

    One thought on “The Last Landscape”

    1. For those of you that would find this an engaging and useful book - all five of yout all five of you on , but all five of you at least somewhat sentient beings within the english speaking world - I beseech you to leave a review that will entice me to read the second half of this book. I aquired this for a dollar or two at a library book discard sell and, a couple years later after reading reference after reference to William's (I think his last name is spelled "Whyte" yet, on this particular web [...]

    2. I am slowly making my way through this book due to time constraints. It contains compelling stuff, though. Whyte was ahead of his time in applying European principles to save urban and suburban open space. One of my recent internships involved writing a literature review of economic impact analyses of multiuse trails and greenways. This book from 1968 is relevant to research being done in 2015 as Whyte extols the values of linear open space in the urban environment. Also, the appropriation of ob [...]

    3. This is a good book, that is certain. Whyte was a fantastic thinker and his work concerning urban spaces was groundbreaking. But there is so much in this book that is so specific to the time in which it was written, its usefulness is limited. There are interesting bits here and there, but as it's nearing 40 years old, the first half in particular is likely going to be interesting only to urban scholars.

    4. You have to be interested in rural planning to appreciate this book but, if you are, it is a really wise and well-informed book. I am!

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