The Colour of Blood

The Colour of Blood The second in the Dublin based crime series by Declan Hughes one of the most acclaimed new crime writers around

  • Title: The Colour of Blood
  • Author: Declan Hughes
  • ISBN: 9780719567483
  • Page: 138
  • Format: Paperback
  • The second in the Dublin based crime series by Declan Hughes one of the most acclaimed new crime writers around

    One thought on “The Colour of Blood”

    1. Don't bother. The book needs a darn good editor and at least a re-write.Hughes can write a chapter very well indeed with all the dialogue and blow by blow required but he has no control , no format other than to try to remake Chandler's The Big Sleep and update it to 21 st century tolerance for incest stories and porn. I find it amazing that the publisher allowed this mess to go out without some aggressive paring down -- say by 100 pages! -- to make it a half decent novel.As for the marketing -- [...]

    2. First Sentence: The last case I worked, I found a sixteen-year-old girl for her father; when she told me what he had done to her, I let her stay lost.PI Ed Loy has been hired to find a dentist’s teenaged daughter. The girl’s porn filmmaker ex-boyfriend turns up dead and the family seems to no longer care what has happened to the girl. With plenty of suspects from whom to chose, Ed is on his own in sorting this case.I tried three times to get into this book and just couldn’t get past the po [...]

    3. Another dark and violent tale from Ireland. In this second book in the series Ed Loy is adjusting to life back in Dublin working as a PI but still without his official license. Just like the first book he is involved with lots of sordid characters with even deeper and darker secrets. This time instead of his family he's dealing with a rich family of doctors that is pretty sexually depraved. Lots of action and a climbing body count as Ed crosses back and forth between what's legal and illegal and [...]

    4. Hughes’s Ed Loy books are the synthesis of Raymond Chandler and Ross Macdonald. Having heard Hughes speak on the primacy of the PI story in crime fiction, it’s easy to see that passion on every page here. Ed Loy gets hired to do a task, follows through to the end because he needs to know. This may not be the way of a real-life PI with bills to pay and a license to maintain, but it makes for intoxicating fiction. In The Color of Blood, Loy finds the motivations for murder in events over twent [...]

    5. Actually, a 1.5. Not the book for me. The characters were poorly developed and the plot was not very credible. The book was about 100 pages too long with way too many uses of the "C" word, and I don't mean "commitment".

    6. This is Raymond Chandler in the 21st century. Everything--the corruption, the perversions, the violence--laid out bare without innuendo or implication. A dark, yet compelling, story but not for the faint of heart.

    7. Ed Loy is basically an American PI from noir novels such as those by Ross MacDonald and Dashiell Hammett transplanted to Dublin. Another detective story with a main character, Loy, drinking too much and wrestling with his demons but it was enjoyable nonetheless. At times, it seemed there was a cast of thousands and I kept having to stop to think who somebody was but the dark and twisted ending was good. I will definitely read more by this author.

    8. THE COLOUR OF BLOOD is the second Ed Loy novel by Declan Hughes, the first being The Wrong Kind of Blood, published in 2006.Ed Loy is a Private Investigator in current day Dublin, Ireland - a place that's part gritty, poor, desperate and part rich, privileged, twisted. Shane Howard is a Dublin dentist, and the son of Dr John Howard, a pillar of Dublin Irish Society, famous in the local area, with a legacy that is maintained by his family. Shane's 19 year old daughter Emily has gone missing and n [...]

    9. THE COLOUR OF BLOOD is the second Ed Loy novel by Declan Hughes, the first being The Wrong Kind of Blood, published in 2006.Ed Loy is a Private Investigator in current day Dublin, Ireland - a place that's part gritty, poor, desperate and part rich, privileged, twisted. Shane Howard is a Dublin dentist, and the son of Dr John Howard, a pillar of Dublin Irish Society, famous in the local area, with a legacy that is maintained by his family. Shane's 19 year old daughter Emily has gone missing and n [...]

    10. First line: The last case I worked, I found a sixteen-year-old girl for her father; when she told me what he had done to her, I let her stay lost.After receiving some compromising photos of his missing teenage daughter, Emily, along with a ransom demand, wealthy Shane Howard employs Dublin private investigator Ed Loy to find her. This task is no difficulty for someone with Ed's knowledge of Dublin's darker side. However, disentangling himself from the Howard family proves more difficult.When Emi [...]

    11. "Nothing's ever what it is, it's always bound up with something else, something that happened in the past." This is a quote from Declan Hughes' "The Color of Blood" but it could as well have been a summary of the main theme in novels written by an American mystery writer, Ross Macdonald. When I was reading the first two chapters I felt as if I were reading a new book by the author of "The Chill" and "The Underground Man", one of my most favorite mystery authors. I fell in love with the first hal [...]

    12. The second Dublin thriller featuring Ed Loy, P. I May 14, 2010 OPENING LINE: The last case I worked, I found a sixteen-year-old girl for her father; when she told me what he had done to her, I let her stay lost.Well, I've just finished the second Declan Hughes Ed Loy crime novel and have to disagree with another reviewer--it's not as good as THE WRONG KIND OF BLOOD, the debut novel. Sure, there's that intriguing and clever opening line that ropes you into the book. And there's that shocking con [...]

    13. Hughes, Declan. THE COLOR OF BLOOD. (2007). ****. After gettinig about twenty pages into this second of Hughes’ ‘Blood’ novels, I realized that I had read it before. Shit! I hate when this happens. Of course, I didn’t remember how it ended, so I had to read about another fifty pages then skip to the end to see how it all turned out. Once again, Hughes takes his hero Ed Loy on a detecting journey. This time, he has to find the daughter of one of the rich families of Dublin. What makes it [...]

    14. Wow. For starters, I hardly predicted anything. And even better, I didn't want to. This book was full of so many great twists and turns, but it was never confusing or unbelievable. I really liked Ed Loy, and the homage his character pays to Sam Spade and Philip Marlowe. In fact, the sexual disfunction of the characters reminded me of The Big Sleep, Mildred Pierce, and of course, Chinatown. But since Hughes is writing in the 21st century, he can be much more blatant than Chandler or Cain was able [...]

    15. I really enjoyed this – like his first book, that were very many characters and sometimes it was hard to keep track of everyone, but as the story unfolded, I found myself deeply involved in fascinated. I like this better than his first book, because it was more original – I haven't really read a book like it before, though I've read very many mysteries – it was all about the strange relationships and twisted past of this very wealthy family. I had a hard time finding the characters likable [...]

    16. Stanley Townsend's narration of the audio version of this dark Dublin tale is brilliant. There must be more than 20 characters, and he has a distinctive voice for each one. He's particularly good at the women and girls, especially the two Lithuanians without papers who have been trafficked by bad boy, Brock Taylor's gang. The cringing whine of Ed Loy's wayward lieutenant Tommy Owens, is my favourite.Borrowed from the library to help pass the time on a series of long car journeys, there were a fe [...]

    17. This is the second installment of the Ed Loy series - Ed is a Dublin PI, transplanted to LA and now back in Ireland. He's hired to find the daughter - who may or may not be involved in the world of pornography - of a somewhat reputable family and very quickly finds himself thrashing around in a family closet full of skeletons. The Color of Blood is a roller coaster ride from start to finish - murders, fires, sex, kidnappings - poor Ed doesn't sleep, rarely eats and is fueled by alcohol. A lot of [...]

    18. A reputable dentist from a venerable medical family, Shane Howard wants Loy to find his lost daughter after receiving a set of photographs featuring nineteen-year-old Emily in provocative poses. But a simple missing persons case rapidly devolves into something even more sordid and grisly when two of the players are savagely slain. And it's only the beginning. The Howard family is not what it seems. Beneath a veneer of wealth and respectability is a dark history of corruption and rot and secrets [...]

    19. Five stars because I gave the first four, whereas they each merit 4.5.I am deeply admiring of a man who can tell a tale in such beautiful language, can describe a conversation with an old and drink-damaged nightwatchman in such a way that I am grinning with delight at the bribery attempt, and can add an ever-increasing, ever-faster number of twists to an always twisting tale yet finish it up fittingly, despite the astonishingly high body count.And retain a sense of caring for the too-curious-for [...]

    20. I have struggled through this book as much, if not more so, than I did with The Wrong Kind of Blood. Big disappointment after City of Lost Girls.Mr. Hughes is working really hard at writing an Irish hardboiled detective novel, but this just doesn't work for me. The book sort of plods along with plenty of grim and depressing happenings and just not much going on that I care about. I don't care whodunit. I don't care why. I just want it to be over.

    21. The Dublin of the Celtic Tiger. Ed Loy, a private investigator, is hired to look for a young woman from a prominent, philanthropic, Dublin family. What he believes is a straightforward missing person search becomes a complicated family drama that spans 30 years. I enjoyed the book and plan to read more in the series. Hughes brings alive the urban, new money, Dublin that was created with the technology boom.

    22. I liked this book, although not as much as much as the 1st Ed Loy book. I found that this novel had a little too many characters, killings / violence & which in total seemed a little unbeliveable & far fetched.As a Dubliner, I enjoy the references to Celtic tiger, change in society / attitudes of Ireland. Although slightly disappointed with this effort, I will stick with this series and look forward to the getting hold of the future novels feat Ed Loy.

    23. Complicated and convoluted story of a family who have a lot of skeletons in their closet. Ed Loy gets involved when Emily, the daughter, is reported kidnapped and her father is sent photographs of her, naked.As Ed uncovers the truth the bodies mount.It's pretty evocative of the messy, complicated feuds that happen in Dublin these days. The body count is pretty high though and you'd have to wonder at the mess it makes of the lives left over.

    24. I do like Declan Hughes's writing but this novel had too many characters, plots and sub plots for me to keep track off. The first few chapters were what kept me going, blackmail and intrigue, pornography and famial sex but after that why does Ed have to sleep with every attractive main character? Lots of violence and murder, good descriptions of Dublin and a sad ending (with yet another sub plot)

    25. Very good for what it was, but I appear to have just discovered that "hard-boiled" is simply not my style. At the risk of sounding stupid, I think my biggest problem was that the plot was a bit hard to follow - everyone was involved in everything and then lied about it - but in Hughes' defense, it was explained nicely in the end, so I could at least finish on a positive note. :)

    26. I decided to give this series another go because I was in Dublin. I still can't find my way to enjoying it. Won't rate it but it isn't for me.

    27. Ok book. First time reading Declan Hughes, enjoyed the story line and characters, but he seems to be long winded on describing things. Can do without the exaggerated lines. Recommend.

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