Mystery of the Roman Ransom

Mystery of the Roman Ransom In these two delightful history mysteries seven boys in Ancient Rome solve strange crimes thanks to some help from their cranky teacher a little bit of logic and a lot of amusing misadventure It se

  • Title: Mystery of the Roman Ransom
  • Author: Henry Winterfeld Fritz Biermann Edith McCormick
  • ISBN: 9780152162689
  • Page: 252
  • Format: Paperback
  • In these two delightful history mysteries, seven boys in Ancient Rome solve strange crimes thanks to some help from their cranky teacher, a little bit of logic, and a lot of amusing misadventure It seems the boys can get nothing right Their teacher s fiftieth birthday is long past they should have done their math homework the servant they bought as a present forIn these two delightful history mysteries, seven boys in Ancient Rome solve strange crimes thanks to some help from their cranky teacher, a little bit of logic, and a lot of amusing misadventure It seems the boys can get nothing right Their teacher s fiftieth birthday is long past they should have done their math homework the servant they bought as a present for his birthday isn t just your run of the mill Gaul slave but a courier running for his life and, to top it all off, the message he s carrying requests the assassination of a Roman senator the father of one of the boys.

    One thought on “Mystery of the Roman Ransom”

    1. This book is an exiting sequel to the Detectives in Togas. The setting is the same except their slave is a secret curior that is carrying a message about witch of the boys fathers is to be murdered! This story is a very good read-at-night or read-when-bored book. There are some parts that you will not understand unless you read the first book!! That is another reason to read the first one (Detectives in Togas) The setting for both the books is in ancient Rome in a schoolhouse with four boys who [...]

    2. I read this book aloud to my kids (7, 10, 12) as part of our history studies this year. (When we last studied ancient Rome, we read Winterfield's previous book Detectives in Togas.) The kids really enjoyed the book, followed the plot well, and were eager to listen each time we read. As an adult, I found the book to be just okay. I typically enjoy the things I read aloud to them more than I did this one. I found it strange that the mystery was "solved" in theory, but they didn't actually get the [...]

    3. Actually 3.5Nice, short, fun little book. A nice break from the other long and complex school lit books I've had lately. I probably would've really enjoyed it at about the age ofne. Would be a perfect read-aloud for my little brothers. Had trouble keeping track of the seven main characters, and coincidences abound, but otherwise this was a great little story.Recommended for youngins of about 7 to 11, especially boys. Or anyone who wants a break from more serious and intense stuff.

    4. Second book to this series. Good book for young readers, 5th grade and up. Group of boys, working together to solve a problem. And a wonderful teacher who helps. My 5th grader enjoyed it and is now going to read the first book.

    5. The Detectives in Togas series was a fun complement to our ancient Rome history lessons. Historical fiction is a perfect way to transport students back in time in an interesting and engaging way. My kids really enjoyed the ride. :-)

    6. In these two delightful history-mysteries, seven boys in Ancient Rome solve strange crimes . . . thanks to some help from their cranky teacher, a little bit of logic, and a lot of amusing misadventure.It seems the boys can get nothing right: Their teacher's fiftieth birthday is long past (they should have done their math homework); the servant they bought as a present for his birthday isn't just your run-of-the-mill Gaul slave but a courier running for his life; and, to top it all off, the messa [...]

    7. A year after reading the first installment into this series (Detectives in Togas), I was pretty excited to see this volume in the tall stack of books my mom purchased through my homeschooling curriculum. If it was anything like the first, this one would be a wild ride.It was. It was flawed, like the first, but the story is a twisting conspiracy involving a paralegal ring of gladiators, a slave, and a pet lion, all experienced by the mischievous and various group of Roman kids that made the first [...]

    8. So far this book is AMAZING. When I first saw it, it looked, well, stupid. But as I read it my interest grew. I would have finished it by now, if I hadn't been re-reading the Harry Potter series (sorry, but even though this book is good, Harry tops them all, except maybe Redwall.)

    9. As rated by my children. This book was written in 1971 (or at least the English translation was published then.) It is full of locations and places in Ancient Rome but I thought a map to refer to would have been very helpful. There was also a lot of logic involved in the story which was fun for the kids. We'll definitely look into more books by this author.

    10. Writing was a bit better in Roman Ransom than in Detectives in Togas. I think these books were originally written in German and then translated into English, which would explain why some of the writing seems disjointed in parts. Still, a super fun story with lots of laughs. The whole family enjoyed it!

    11. Exciting mystery to solve and prevent the murder of one of the boy's fathers. Many quick turns and reversals that keep the reader on his or her toes. Xantippus and Mucius save the day with help from Antonious and Udo the slave.

    12. This is a sequel to Detectives in Togas. The kids liked this one just as well. I didn't think it quite as funny, but it still had its moments. And it had more "mystery".Another fun book to read with your study of Rome or just for fun.

    13. I wasn't so exited to read this book, since it looked like a boy book. But, even though it had the main charicters boys, it was still a lot of fun to read. I liked knowing all the Greek names for the Roman gods.

    14. Even better than the first volume "Detectives in Togas" (German "Caius ist ein Dummkopf"). Just finished reading it to my son who cannot wait for the third volume. He could read himself but wants me to do a scenic lecture.

    15. This sequel to Detective in Togas is just as enjoyable and witty as it was! Funny, entertaining and full of mishaps and antics as the boys try to solve the mystery of which of their fathers is about to be assassinated and why. A great read for all ages.

    16. This was wonderful fun. A great supplement to homeschooling on ancient Rome, the author works in little bits about the history while weaving a page-turning mystery full of action and adventure.

    17. Read this with the kids. It was originally written in German and translated to English. That made it difficult to read sometimes.

    18. Hilarious, witty, suspenseful and solid historical fiction - it freaked me out as a kid, but then I was easily disturbed.

    19. I read this for Tara's schooling. It was pretty lame historical fiction - still better than a textbook though.

    20. Another Mystery by Henry Winterfield with lot of clues that you don't even know about until you have read the whole thing.

    21. A continuation of Detectives in Togas. The seven Roman students come across another mystery in ancient Rome.Also very funny.

    22. Another ancient Roman mystery by the author of Detectives in Togas. As fun as the first. We wished there were more!

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