Magic City

Magic City Tulsa Oklahoma A white woman and a black man are alone in an elevator Suddenly the woman screams the man runs out and the chase to capture and lynch him begins When Joe a young man trying t

  • Title: Magic City
  • Author: Jewell Parker Rhodes
  • ISBN: 9780060929077
  • Page: 260
  • Format: Paperback
  • Tulsa, Oklahoma, 1921 A white woman and a black man are alone in an elevator Suddenly, the woman screams, the man runs out, and the chase to capture and lynch him begins.When Joe, a young man trying to be the next Houdini, is accused of rape, he must perform his greatest escape by eluding a bloodthirsty lynch mob And Mary, the motherless daughter of a farmer who tries tTulsa, Oklahoma, 1921 A white woman and a black man are alone in an elevator Suddenly, the woman screams, the man runs out, and the chase to capture and lynch him begins.When Joe, a young man trying to be the next Houdini, is accused of rape, he must perform his greatest escape by eluding a bloodthirsty lynch mob And Mary, the motherless daughter of a farmer who tries to marry her off to the farmhand who viciously raped her, must find the courage to help exonerate the man she had accused with her panicked cry Based on true events, Magic City is a portrait of an era, climaxing in the heroic but doomed stand that pitted the National Guard against a small band of black men determined to defend the town they had built into the Negro Wall Street Named by the Chicago Tribune as a Favorite Book of 1997

    One thought on “Magic City”

    1. An important and eerily relevant book, 'Magic City' recreates the buildup and immediate aftermath of the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921, which saw a mob of whites methodically burn and destroy one of the nation's most affluent black neighborhoods. It was a disgraceful time in this country's history, a bloody crescendo of the post-reconstruction era. One of the key themes of the book is that racial tension can build into a powder keg - all it takes is a spark for the whole thing to go off. Let's hope th [...]

    2. This was a story based on true events that happened in the 1920's. It shows how hateful people can be. Mary is a white woman whose mother died when she was young. She takes care of her father and brother on their farm as well as working as an elevator operator in a business office in town.Joe is a likeable young black man, soon to turn 18 years old. He comes from a prominent black family in Greenwood, the black community. He prefers to shine shoes instead of going into the banking business with [...]

    3. The amount of hatred at the time is horrible. Joe, a black shoe shiner, gets in a whites only elevator to comfort the white female operator. To him she looked distraught and he wanted to put a smile on her face. Unbeknownst to him, she had just been raped by her fathers helper. At some point during this elevator ride, she screams and faints. Joe, knowing what this looks like, runs as soon as the elevator door opens. This is the beginning of the end of a whole town of people.The scream of one whi [...]

    4. Jewell Parker Rhodes is the speaker this week at the Jackson District Library Word Wise Celebration. In preparation for her visit, I decided to read one of her books and chose "Magic City". Historical fiction isn't a genre I usually select but this book moved me.The author took a terrible episode out of African American experience in this country and turned it into a story about people you came to care about. You'll wonder why you never heard about the Tulsa Race Riots of 1921 before but you'll [...]

    5. Add to my list of Things I Never Learned in History Class: The Tulsa riots of 1921, the existence and destruction of Greenwood (the "Black Wall Street"). According to Rhodes' afterward,for over a year, the Black citizens of Greenwood were forced to live in internment camps and carry green cards (although I wasn't able to confirm this last bit after a quick search on-line, but perhaps a more savvy searcher or history buff can confirm/deny this?)

    6. powerful story -- two people divided by race but forever joined by fate; white woman raped and black man accused; the event which all but erased (burned to the ground) Greenwood, Oklahoma (the Black Wall Street of its time) from the map; Tulsa still stands but Greenwood was never the same. The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921 still stands as a tragedy of monumental proportions and the history of it has been ignored since the 20's. Sad but true.

    7. This is one of those buried treasures. No one's heard of it, but it's a great read, and it's centered around a historical event no one knows about: the Tulsa, OK race riots in the 1920s. I first read it in college because the author came to Alma, but it's one of my favorite books. I've loaned it to several students, and they've all loved it, too.

    8. A fictional spin on the 1921 Tulsa Race Riots. Ms. Rhodes surely can write to ignite the sparks of hatred and fuel them into a fire of emotion. It made me wonder why we never hear about the race riots which killed over 300 people (mostly black). This is a sweeping tale that will not only tug at your heart, but nearly break it in two.

    9. What a fantastic fictitious account of one of the ugliest chapters of Tulsa history. Parker Rhodes has a Toni Morrison style with her magical realism. I recommend this book to those who enjoy historical fiction or would like a or some perspective on the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921.

    10. I had no intention of reading all night when I picked up this book, but I could not put it down. I also never expected to find the ghost of Harry Houdini speaking within the book, a voice that--along with this story of courage--haunts me still.

    11. Andy: 2.9 Peaks and a stick of dynamite. Chad: 1.8 Peaks and a slow march up Mt. Zion. Jim: 2.9 Peaks- Nigger, who do you think you are? Scott: 2.5 Peaks swimming with Lena's bones. Noel: Slept with Francine after Henry and Gabe--sloppy thir

    12. Until I can articulate my specific flavor of awe at the intimacy and immediacy of the writer/story/reader connection, I will have to quote someone else:"Jewell Parker Rhodes's characters hover. They dance and sing and cry and whisper secrets in your ear." --Emerge

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