Southern Californialand: Mid-Century Culture in Kodachrome

Southern Californialand Mid Century Culture in Kodachrome Best selling author historian and performance artist Charles Phoenix follows up his remarkable hit book Southern California in the s with an even remarkable Kodachrome study of the world that exist

  • Title: Southern Californialand: Mid-Century Culture in Kodachrome
  • Author: Charles Phoenix Amy Inouye
  • ISBN: 9781883318420
  • Page: 466
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Best selling author, historian and performance artist Charles Phoenix follows up his remarkable hit book Southern California in the 50s with an even remarkable Kodachrome study of the world that existed between Santa Barbara and San Diego in the 40s, 50s and 60s His retro slide tour takes readers to places they never dreamed existed, and our guide tags along withBest selling author, historian and performance artist Charles Phoenix follows up his remarkable hit book Southern California in the 50s with an even remarkable Kodachrome study of the world that existed between Santa Barbara and San Diego in the 40s, 50s and 60s His retro slide tour takes readers to places they never dreamed existed, and our guide tags along with amateur photographers who snapped the best of Southern California.

    One thought on “Southern Californialand: Mid-Century Culture in Kodachrome”

    1. When we were moving from Los Angeles, I went out to find a book of local photography to take with us. (It's a thing I do whenever I've moved.) Instead, however, I came across this collection. The photos, after all, are set in Southern Californiad they're a whole lot more interesting than one more shot of the Hollywood sign or the big ballerina clown on that corner in Venice. I've since come to adore the collections of Charles Phoenix. I love the whole Kodachrome scene, I love mid-century artifac [...]

    2. I love nostalgia and old photos of familiar places. Charles Phoenix is a local guy who loves the same things and has made a great living out of collecting and presenting them in an engaging and fun way. John and I tried to go see one of his live presentations at the Pomona library a couple of years ago, but the venue was so crowded (and we weren't real early) we got turned away for lack of space. Alas, I'll just keep enjoying his books.

    3. Going through these old photos (mostly slides rescued from discarded collections) is like going through a time machine. The fact that they're from everyday life (and not the artificial portrayal you might find in period advertisments, catalogs, postcards etc) make them all the more interesting. And if you're old enough, you notice a detail or two and think "Oh yeah! I remember those!"

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