These Tangled Threads

These Tangled Threads Raised in an atmosphere of equality Daughtie Winfield is outspoken in her support for the rights of others from the mill girls threatening a strike over pitiful working conditions to the immigrants

  • Title: These Tangled Threads
  • Author: Tracie Peterson Judith McCoy Miller
  • ISBN: 9780764226908
  • Page: 439
  • Format: Paperback
  • Raised in an atmosphere of equality, Daughtie Winfield is outspoken in her support for the rights of others, from the mill girls threatening a strike over pitiful working conditions to the immigrants living on the other side of town So she is unprepared for the hostility even from some who claim to hold similar beliefs aroused by her growing friendship with Liam DonohueRaised in an atmosphere of equality, Daughtie Winfield is outspoken in her support for the rights of others, from the mill girls threatening a strike over pitiful working conditions to the immigrants living on the other side of town So she is unprepared for the hostility even from some who claim to hold similar beliefs aroused by her growing friendship with Liam Donohue, an Irish artisan.Behind the scenes, a disgruntled former employee conspires with a one time mill partner in a devilish plan that imperils not only the operation of the mills but those dearest to Daughtie As dissention and upheaval threaten the future of the textile industry, Daughtie longs for peace in her working world and deep within her heart.

    One thought on “These Tangled Threads”

    1. This book felt like it tried to cram a lot of issues into very few pages. I would have liked to see some of these issues (inequality, sexism, racism, etc) addressed earlier in the series so they could have been wrapped up in this book. I have loaned this series to my grandmother as I think they may be more to her liking.

    2. Concluded the series of "Bells of Lowell". A wonderful series when women first started to work outside the home in American mills weaving cotton. Most of the cotton was raised in the South with slaves working the fields. It was a time that freedom was discussed among sexes and cultures. Negroes were thought to be below whites, and in this period of history, the Irish had also come to America and were thought to be poor and trashy. Through the Word of God, some come to realize that no one people [...]

    3. The third book in the Bells of Lowell series captures the story of Daughtie as she fights for the equality of every citizen, regardless of heritage. From the implications of her association with an Irish worker to her stand of beliefs due to workplace conditions, her growth as a woman of independence is tested, as well as her faith. And as friendship grows to love, she risks losing the friendships she's held dear since her new life in Lowell began. In the space a few short years, Daughtie has em [...]

    4. I borrowed from the library but I intend to purchase the whole series of 6 books. I could read them over and over and I rarely find books that I would do that with. I love these Lowell series. I have learned so much about the textile industry, the life, and beliefs of the 1800s from these books in addition to God's plan. I highly recommend these books Lights of Lowell as well as Bells of Lowells. These well research,captivating book have som much into them and read fast. I could not put them dow [...]

    5. This is a poor finale for the three book arc. It just feels like too many issues crammed into 300 pages: racism, sexism, classism, anger, industrial change over keeping things as they were, and espionoge just don't untangle. Abolishenism and the eclogy of the area just seem asides. And the ending just doesn't wash

    6. Another great read from Tracie Peterson. The Belles of Lowell series transports you to a different time when life was tough and finding true friends was even tougher. The chronicling of these girls lives during the industrial revolution will make you laugh, cry and thank God for your 8-5 desk job! Be ready to be sucked in to a series you won't want to put down!

    7. My favorite of this series! Other reviews have said that they felt that there were many issues (slavery, social classes, ext.) crammed in this book. But I didn't feel that way. I really enjoyed this book!

    8. This was a great ending to a great series. It is not fast paced, but the history is amazing, there is enough romance and mystery to keep you interested and the writing is top-notch. You feel like you get to know the girls and their struggles.

    9. Daughtie must decide whether to marry an Irish man despite that it might make her an outcast.Will the girls at the textile mills strike?

    10. This book took too much time talking about the textile industry ,I started skimming through it to get to the personal ,interesting parts which were about hiding slaves and the Irish immigrants.

    11. It was a fun book with unusual characters. It took place in the early 1800's when the color of your skin and where you were born made a big difference. So sad.

    12. Enjoyed the book, but the end seemed a little rushed or compacted to make a resolution for all the storylines going on.

    13. This series of 3 books was very good. It was interesting learning about the 1830's industrialization with textile mills, anti-slavery, as well as personal struggles in life. I enjoyed these books.

    14. I had to finish the trilogy. Much the same as the others, but not unpleasant by any means. A light quick read.

    15. I thought this was a very good book. I really enjoyed reading it. The plot and the characters were very well written. I was hooked from page one. I can not wait to keep on reading this series.

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