Domestic Revolutions: A Social History Of American Family Life

Domestic Revolutions A Social History Of American Family Life The American family has undergone a series of transformations from its socially sanctified role as the center of society to today s private independent unit The authors explain just how the family ha

  • Title: Domestic Revolutions: A Social History Of American Family Life
  • Author: Steven Mintz Susan M. Kellogg Susan Kellogg
  • ISBN: 9780029212912
  • Page: 310
  • Format: Paperback
  • The American family has undergone a series of transformations from its socially sanctified role as the center of society to today s private, independent unit The authors explain just how the family has adapted and endured these changes.

    One thought on “Domestic Revolutions: A Social History Of American Family Life”

    1. Really interesting. I'm always surprised by how much of what we 'know' about the past is assumed and has nothing to do with reality. Especially liked the quote below:'History reminds us that American families have been through periods of crisis before and that despite recurrent fears for the impending demise of the family, the institution as such has not disappeared. The history of American family life suggests that we need not be disturbed by change in and of itself, because change—and not st [...]

    2. This is a useful book for those studying the history of the American family. However, at this point it is very dated. The numbers are slightly off, the analysis derives strongly from the period in which it was written, and it really should be updated. However, there is not another textbook of this caliber with this sort of information. Use it for your class, but don't assign it, and make sure to supplement it with lots of fresher materials.My other objection to this work is that I read it in Dec [...]

    3. I might have been impressed by this book had I read it in 1988, the year it was published. Since then it has become outdated, and I have read many better and more scholarly works on the subject. I was annoyed by multiple instances of repetitious facts and ideas, and by the author's inability to subvert his own biases when writing supposedly objective analysis. I did like the bits and pieces inserted on family law; that was really the only "new" thing I learned from Domestic Revolutions.

    4. Mostly dry facts, separated by time period in American history. There's also some thesis confusion. Were the fifties a historical oddity that shouldn't be held up as the ideal, or has the family been disintegrating since then? This could've been any number of other books more focused on specific topics, like the evolution of gender roles, or focused on particular time periods, and that might have made it more readable, but I do think it's valuable to have all this information in one place.

    5. spends most of the time in the 19th century. fairly good though. it's divided by subj like sociology books, but it's still really helpful. what's really nice is that there are pictures of families throughout american history. that part was really cool (and obviously my favorite). actually one of the few to tie medical advances, war, and expenses into how families mobilize, seek help and interact with each other.

    6. Not an easy read, and it is meant to be studied. But it reveals some very important facts and ideas about where the family was before the industrial revolution. I think it could prove to be a great place for where the family might need to go again. Back to apprenticships for teens and closer communities.

    7. I read this for my American Family History class and really enjoyed it. It was interesting to see how family dynamics have changed through the years. It was even more fascinating as I understood how my own family, especially my parents, fit into history.

    8. Required reading for my class. Interesting to read about the changes in family structure as economic and political influences changed. But not something I would pick up on my own. It was printed in 1988. Could use an update since there have been many more changes since then.

    9. Profoundly enlightening and interesting read for anyone interested in the history of the American family.

    10. This book is dated a little 1988 - but most of history is still the same - I thoroughly enjoyed it. This was the text for my family History class and well worth studying it.

    11. Very wordy, and a little lengthy. Easy to read than Mary Ryan's book, but still too drawn out for my taste. Very factual and covers the span of different classes, but not particularly helpful.

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