The Muse Learns to Write: Reflections on Orality and Literacy from Antiquity to the Present

The Muse Learns to Write Reflections on Orality and Literacy from Antiquity to the Present When oral culture becomes literate in what way does human consciousness itself change And how does the new form of communication affect the content and meaning of texts In this book one of the most

  • Title: The Muse Learns to Write: Reflections on Orality and Literacy from Antiquity to the Present
  • Author: Eric Alfred Havelock
  • ISBN: 9780300043822
  • Page: 106
  • Format: Paperback
  • When oral culture becomes literate, in what way does human consciousness itself change And how does the new form of communication affect the content and meaning of texts In this book, one of the most original and penetrating thinkers in Greek studies describes the transformation from orality to literacy in classical times and reflects upon its continued meaning for us toWhen oral culture becomes literate, in what way does human consciousness itself change And how does the new form of communication affect the content and meaning of texts In this book, one of the most original and penetrating thinkers in Greek studies describes the transformation from orality to literacy in classical times and reflects upon its continued meaning for us today Fresh insights into the orality literacy shift in human consciousness from one who has long been studying this shift in ancient Greece and has now brought his vast learning and reflections to bear on our own times This book is for a wide audience and calls for thoroughly rethinking current views on language, thought, and society from classical scholarship through modern philosophy, anthropology, and poststructuralism Walter J Ong All in all, we have in this book the summary statement of one of the great pioneers in the study of oral and literate culture, fascinating in its scope and rewarding in its sophistication As have his other works, this book will contribute mightily to curing the biases resulting from our own literacy J Peter Denny, Canadian Journal of Linguistics An extremely useful summary and extension of the revisionist thinking of Eric Havelock, whom most classicists and comparatists would rank among the premier classical scholars of the last three decades The book presents important though controversial ideas in an available format Choice

    One thought on “The Muse Learns to Write: Reflections on Orality and Literacy from Antiquity to the Present”

    1. About 28 centuries ago, one of the most importance occurrences in what would eventually become Europe took place: the sudden evolution of the Phoenician syllabary into the full Greek alphabet we know today. Before this time, absolutely all information had to be transmitted orally: from contracts between parties to how to become a Greek citizen to knowledge of everything from your complex family genealogy to how to engage on the battlefield. Two scholars, Milman Parry and Albert Lord, together pr [...]

    2. One of the most frustrating books I have read in awhile. This work is not meant to be read by itself, but in conjunction with others--probably his other published works, but I highly recommend reading the article by John Havlerson, "Havelock on Greek orality and literacy." Journal of the History of Ideas (1992): 148-163, if you want to get an understanding (and critique) of Havelock's arguments. Walter Ong's Orality and Literacy is another, for a different perspective.For the most part, Havelock [...]

    3. This book totally blew me away. Even though this is my area I have been away so long that I did not have an inkling of this inspiring and challenging look at the way that orality and literature interacted in the latest classical discussion. This should at least be on the reading list as a complimentary study for all English students as well as classical ones. Perhaps I am the only one who was not acquainted with this latest juggernaut into the world of classical students. If you are unaware like [...]

    4. Es una pequeña muestra del trabajo de E. A. Havelock, sobre oralidad y procesos de transición hacia la escritura. Más aún resulta impresionante el pequeño capítulo dedicado a la "Radio y el redescubrimiento de la Retórica"

    5. This is without a doubt, one of the best pieces of literary theory I've read in my life. Bravo Havelock, you've got yourself a fangirl.

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