The Voice of America: Lowell Thomas and the Invention of 20th-Century Journalism

The Voice of America Lowell Thomas and the Invention of th Century Journalism The first and definitive biography of an audacious adventurer the most famous journalist of his time who than anyone invented contemporary journalism Tom Brokaw says Lowell Thomas so deserves this liv

  • Title: The Voice of America: Lowell Thomas and the Invention of 20th-Century Journalism
  • Author: Mitchell Stephens
  • ISBN: 9781137279828
  • Page: 141
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The first and definitive biography of an audacious adventurer the most famous journalist of his time who than anyone invented contemporary journalism.Tom Brokaw says Lowell Thomas so deserves this lively account of his legendary life He was a man for all seasons Mitchell Stephens s The Voice of America is a first rate and much needed biography of the great LowellThe first and definitive biography of an audacious adventurer the most famous journalist of his time who than anyone invented contemporary journalism.Tom Brokaw says Lowell Thomas so deserves this lively account of his legendary life He was a man for all seasons Mitchell Stephens s The Voice of America is a first rate and much needed biography of the great Lowell Thomas Nobody can properly understand broadcast journalism without reading Stephens s riveting account of this larger than life globetrotting radio legend Douglas Brinkley, Professor of History at Rice University and author of CronkiteFew Americans today recognize his name, but Lowell Thomas was as well known in his time as any American journalist ever has been Raised in a Colorado gold rush town, Thomas covered crimes and scandals for local then Chicago newspapers He began lecturing on Alaska, after spending eight days in Alaska Then he assigned himself to report on World War I and returned with an exclusive the story of Lawrence of Arabia In 1930, Lowell Thomas began delivering America s initial radio newscast His was the trusted voice that kept Americans abreast of world events in turbulent decades his face familiar, too, as the narrator of the most popular newsreels His contemporaries were also dazzled by his life In a prime time special after Thomas died in 1981, Walter Cronkite said that Thomas had crammed a couple of centuries worth of living into his eighty nine years Thomas delighted in entering forbidden countries Tibet, for example, where he met the teenaged Dalai Lama The Explorers Club has named its building, its awards, and its annual dinner after him.Journalists in the last decades of the twentieth century including Cronkite and Tom Brokaw acknowledged a profound debt to Thomas Though they may not know it, journalists today too are following a path he blazed In The Voice of America, Mitchell Stephens offers a hugely entertaining, sometimes critical portrait of this larger than life figure.

    One thought on “The Voice of America: Lowell Thomas and the Invention of 20th-Century Journalism”

    1. "The Voice of America" is the story of Lowell Thomas, a journalist whose life seemed to follow the news through its different forms of presentation: paper, radio, television. He was once the most well-known journalist in the U.S truly the Voice of America, well before the likes of Walter Cronkite and Tom Brokaw. It's no secret that there are a lot of questions about journalism and media these days. Have a certain opinion? There is probably a news outlet or "news outlet" that will cater to your o [...]

    2. As a journalist, it was easy to be intrigued with a man I had never heard of before but was credited as being a well-known American journalist. In the 1930s, his voice opened doors for him in radio and his zigzagging career path and his easy affability raised him to eventual financial success. But in the opening chapters of the book, it was easy to ask when can I cheer for him? When is his career going to take off? When will he be out of debt?! Lowell Thomas loved to travel, and again I could id [...]

    3. I won this book in a First Reads Contest.It was just not yo my liking. It was interesting subject matter but just dragged when it came to establishing who Lowell Thomas was. It needed to focus less on before he became a journalist because that was dead dull. It wore me out before I could finish the book. I only got halfway through before giving up on it.I am sure there are readers for this book is just not my type of biography.

    4. Several of the reviewers of this bio have complained that Lowell Thomas seldom gets the attention that other early radio personalities have received. That is in part because Stephens focuses on the swashbuckling story of Thomas's life and the growth of radio. At the same time, it gives us a powerful starting point of the impact on radio on the masses. The best pages are filled with how Thomas helped make the story of Laurence of Arabia.

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