Come On In, America: The United States in World War I

Come On In America The United States in World War I On April the United States declared war on Germany and joined World War I German submarine attacks on American ships in March were the overt motive for declaring war but the underlying

  • Title: Come On In, America: The United States in World War I
  • Author: Linda Barrett Osborne
  • ISBN: 9781419723780
  • Page: 488
  • Format: Hardcover
  • On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and joined World War I German submarine attacks on American ships in March 1917 were the overt motive for declaring war, but the underlying reasons were far complex Even after the United States officially joined, Americans were divided on whether they should be a part of it Americans were told they were fiOn April 6, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and joined World War I German submarine attacks on American ships in March 1917 were the overt motive for declaring war, but the underlying reasons were far complex Even after the United States officially joined, Americans were divided on whether they should be a part of it Americans were told they were fighting a war for democracy, but with racial segregation rampant in the United States, new laws against dissent and espionage being passed, and bankers and industrial leaders gaining increased influence and power, what did democracy mean Come On In, America explores not only how and why the United States joined World War I, but also the events at home and overseas that changed the course of American history.

    One thought on “Come On In, America: The United States in World War I”

    1. E ARC From Edelweiss Above the TreelineThis was certainly very completed, well researched, and had a decent amount of pictures to accompany the text. However, since WWI is not a topic covered in our school curriculum, I have more need for shorter, more interesting books on the topic. The text in this was very dense, which is great for research or for high school students who want a complete overview, but I don't think my middle school students would pick it up to read for fun. I need a few more [...]

    2. Read the full review at An Inkling ReviewsThis book was great! Where was it in 2014 when all of my students were writing about WW1 because of the centenary? It's absolutely perfect for a school library, and a good pick for budding history buffs.What I likedCovers different aspects of the war: Barrett Osborne provides information regarding the front lines, the home front, the roles of women and African Americans, weapons used, whether or not the US was actually neutral, and much more. Information [...]

    3. This is a complete history of World War 1. How it started and how typical Americans felt about our participation in it. (Spoiler- we weren't all convinced it was a very good idea) The fact that we passed espionage laws for the first time was telling. The press was censored in all print forms. It should have been the war to end all wars as at was sold to the public but instead by studying this war it is easy to see why WW2 ended up happening. Germany was defeated, but they still occupied parts of [...]

    4. Disclaimer: I read this book as an advance copy from Netgalley. My thanks go to them, ABRAMS Kids and to the author, Linda Barrett Osborne, for this opportunity. The opinions stated in the review are my own.This is a very interesting look at the events surrounding the United States involvement with World War I. I studied some US history several years ago, both at school and at University, and was fascinated by how the different US political approach to conflict contrasted to that of the European [...]

    5. A new children's non-fiction book on America's involvement in World War I. It is fitting since the U.S. sent troops a hundred years ago and three years after the war began. The book gives a cursory look at some of the major battles American troop fought. The best chapters were on the home front, African American involvement in the war, and the war's aftermath. The book does not shy away from the ugly parts of the war. This book is aimed at 'Tweens (10-14 years of age). A quick engaging read.

    6. Anyone interested in WW I should find this book interesting. Taken from several different views, it gives lots of insight into why government is the way it is today. While a few middle school history buffs may enjoy it, I'm thinking more high school and even adult. WWI really isn't covered much in school these days

    7. I wanted a book to recommend to students about WWI. This isn't it. It is disorganized and defines words it doesn't think children will know in a clunky way (see Lemony Snicket for examples making fun of what I'm talking about.)

    8. Informative, quick read that introduces readers to key points of WWI. I learned some new info about what was happening on the domestic front!

    9. This book sounds fascinating and I am hoping to read it soon. World War I is an era I do not know much about, but as it had such a large impact on my parents lives, and my mother just passed, I want to know more. The most education thing I have witnessed so far about World War I is a video game called Valiant Hearts, which truly showed me more than anything they taught me in school.

    10. This book put World War I in perspective and highlighted, to me at least, exaggerations and inaccuracies I picked up from school about this war. It did a good job explaining new vocabulary for students not familiar with the terms so even if a student didn't have much background knowledge of World War I, they would still find this book accessible.

    11. Thoughtful, thought-provoking introduction to World War I, the war touted to be the War to End All Wars, Not just for middle grade readers--good for anyone who wants to better understand the era and how America came into the fight.

    12. While I thoroughly admired the intention, the level of detail, and the educational value of this book, at the same time it seemed to be both a little too short and a little too dense. Writing about history for a young audience is tough - I understand that - and from a historical perspective, it really did seem to tell the story of the time period from many angles and perspectives without sugarcoating or hiding challenging truths. It wasn't ALL history or ALL about soldiers, and the inclusion of [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *