Iep Jaltok: Poems from a Marshallese Daughter

Iep Jaltok Poems from a Marshallese Daughter As the seas rise the fight intensifies to save the Pacific Ocean s Marshall Islands from being devoured by the waters around them At the same time activists are raising their poetic voices against d

  • Title: Iep Jaltok: Poems from a Marshallese Daughter
  • Author: Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner
  • ISBN: 9780816534029
  • Page: 446
  • Format: Paperback
  • As the seas rise, the fight intensifies to save the Pacific Ocean s Marshall Islands from being devoured by the waters around them At the same time, activists are raising their poetic voices against decades of colonialism, environmental destruction, and social injustice.Marshallese poet and activist Kathy Jetnil Kijiner s writing highlights the traumas of colonialism, racAs the seas rise, the fight intensifies to save the Pacific Ocean s Marshall Islands from being devoured by the waters around them At the same time, activists are raising their poetic voices against decades of colonialism, environmental destruction, and social injustice.Marshallese poet and activist Kathy Jetnil Kijiner s writing highlights the traumas of colonialism, racism, forced migration, the legacy of American nuclear testing, and the impending threats of climate change Bearing witness at the front lines of various activist movements inspires her work and has propelled her poetry onto international stages, where she has performed in front of audiences ranging from elementary school students to than a hundred world leaders at the United Nations Climate Summit.The poet connects us to Marshallese daily life and tradition, likening her poetry to a basket and its essential materials Her cultural roots and her family provides the thick fiber, the structure of the basket Her diasporic upbringing is the material which wraps around the fiber, an essential layer to the structure of her experiences And her passion for justice and change, the passion which brings her to the front lines of activist movements is the stitching that binds these two experiences together.Iep Jaltok will make history as the first published book of poetry written by a Marshallese author, and it ushers in an important new voice for justice.

    One thought on “Iep Jaltok: Poems from a Marshallese Daughter”

    1. I came to Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner's poetry through the radio program Living on Earth, which featured her performing her poem "Tell Them." It was early morning and I was half asleep, but the poem got its hooks in me, and as soon as she finished, I went to the Living on Earth website so I could read it and hear it again, and from there to Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner's website, and from there to buying this book. These poems are so moving. The combination of strong feeling, vivid images, serious topics, and [...]

    2. “baam̧ (baham). From Engl. 2(inf, tr-e) 3,4,6(-i). Bomb. As inKobaam̧ ke?                                        Are you contaminated                                                                                          with radioactive fallout?”(“The letter B is for”)

    3. Really enjoyable collection. The end poem packed a bigger punch for me, they felt louder. The beginning was kind of quiet. I really love the structure of the collection, the roundness/full-circle-ness of "basket." I want more Pacific poetry collections, this is just the tip of the iceberg for Marshallese people and other islands. We need to hear these stories and take action to prevent heinous human rights violations/disasters. Thank you Kathy!

    4. This is the first collection by Marshallese poet Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner and one worthy of any book shelf. Whether you're well-versed in the history of the Marshall Islands or can barely locate Micronesia on a map, Jetnil-Kijiner's words resonate strongly because they're anchored in universal themes -- family, culture, identity, and belonging. In Iep Jaltok, Jetnil-Kijiner addresses global issues like climate change and migration through poems that offer a first-hand glimpse into a country and peop [...]

    5. "Jetñil-Kijiner’s narration of radiation-related deaths in her community, and her necessary departure from the “hot” shores of home, reveal an inhospitable resettling on Hawaii as an environmental exile." - Shé HawkeThis book was reviewed in the Sept/Oct 2017 issue of World Literature Today magazine. Read the full review by visiting our website:worldliteraturetoday/

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