Black Water

Black Water Albert Edward s life in th century England is punctuated by bouts of unexplained seizures and lapses into unconsciousness that label him a freak and a madman and severely limit his contact with the

  • Title: Black Water
  • Author: Rachel Anderson
  • ISBN: 9780698114210
  • Page: 158
  • Format: Paperback
  • Albert Edward s life in 19th century England is punctuated by bouts of unexplained seizures and lapses into unconsciousness that label him a freak and a madman and severely limit his contact with the outside world In fact, he suffers from epilepsy, a greatly misunderstood disease during the Victorian era Frightening, fascinating and inspiring School Library JournAlbert Edward s life in 19th century England is punctuated by bouts of unexplained seizures and lapses into unconsciousness that label him a freak and a madman and severely limit his contact with the outside world In fact, he suffers from epilepsy, a greatly misunderstood disease during the Victorian era Frightening, fascinating and inspiring School Library Journal, starred review.

    One thought on “Black Water”

    1. "Although you will find that ravel and change is full of heaps of botherations, it will affect you for better rather than worse."Albert is a boy who suffers from epilepsy (known as the falling sickness in this time period). It is a condition that is misunderstood and feared and therefore Albert's mother insists that Albert stays indoors all the time and never talk to anyone. He spends his time painting pictures of flowers for his mother to sell. Just as Albert makes his first real friend, Lawrie [...]

    2. Oh, the joys of reading wherein so much is learned from one small book!Well written and insightful, the author provides vivid descriptions of Victorian England and a time when epilepsy was perceived as an affliction of the demonically possessed and of someone quite batty in the head and insane. This is the story of Albert who lived with his mother who loved him and tried her best to protect him.With little available resources, she sought those who might help understand her son's condition. Alas, [...]

    3. I'm not sure how or why I have this book, but in purging my bookshelves of books to sell/give away this ended up in the get-rid-of pile. I'm loathe to get rid of a book I have never read, so despite the books dubious addition to the bookshelf I decided to read it before tossing it.It was fine, and interesting even, but just not that great. It was about a boy growing up in England in the 1800s with epilepsy and all the predjudive he faced and the inner turmoil he had trying to figure out what was [...]

    4. Hmmm. A rather dark story about a child with epilepsy. He is not allowed to be educated because he won't be able to hold a job, is not allowed around other kids because he has 20 seizures a month, and is subjected to all sorts of medical and spiritual treatments although he does seem to get the best of what his culture offers. He meets Edward Lear, who is able to hide his own epilepsy from the world by locking himself in his room while he has seizures. Story is set in England with a short journe [...]

    5. I was caught up with this narrative, which effortlessly channels a 19th-century voice to tell the story of a boy with epilepsy, in a time when there were no drug treatments. As far as I can tell, the descriptions of the epileptic seizures are pretty accurate (my late wife was an epileptic, so I have some experience, but of course only from the outside). The ending seemed rather rushed, however, and the fortuitous appearance of epileptic writer/artist (and thus role model) Edward Lear strained be [...]

    6. This book was beautifully, poetically written. This is an enchanting book for kids and adults with wonderful tale to tell. It does a wonderful job describing not only what it was like to epileptic in Victorian England, but also what it can feel like to be epileptic today. It also does a great job just describing what it was like to grow up in Victorian England.

    7. I liked the way this book touches on the subject of epilepsy in the early 1900's. The writing is a bit choppy so that cost a few stars.

    8. This is a 3+ starrer. A Victorian slice of lifer about an epileptic flower painter adolescent inspired by the life of Edward Lear. Good period detail with an interesting conceit.

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