The Year's Best Horror Stories: I

The Year s Best Horror Stories I Contents Double Whammy by Robert BlochThe Sister City by Brian LumleyWhen Morning Comes by Elizabeth FancettPrey by Richard MathesonWinter by Kit ReedLucifer by E C TubbI Wonder What He Wanted by Eddy

  • Title: The Year's Best Horror Stories: I
  • Author: RichardDavis Richard Matheson Robert Bloch Ralph Norton Terri E. Pinckard Celia Fremlin David Riley Robert McNear
  • ISBN: 9789997541611
  • Page: 436
  • Format: Textbook Binding
  • Contents Double Whammy by Robert BlochThe Sister City by Brian LumleyWhen Morning Comes by Elizabeth FancettPrey by Richard MathesonWinter by Kit ReedLucifer by E.C TubbI Wonder What He Wanted by Eddy C BertinProblem Child by Peter OldaleThe Scar by Ramsey CampbellWarp by Ralph NortonThe Hate by Terri E PinckardA Quiet Game by Celia FremlinAfter Nightfall by David RileyContents Double Whammy by Robert BlochThe Sister City by Brian LumleyWhen Morning Comes by Elizabeth FancettPrey by Richard MathesonWinter by Kit ReedLucifer by E.C TubbI Wonder What He Wanted by Eddy C BertinProblem Child by Peter OldaleThe Scar by Ramsey CampbellWarp by Ralph NortonThe Hate by Terri E PinckardA Quiet Game by Celia FremlinAfter Nightfall by David RileyDeath s Door by Robert McNear

    One thought on “The Year's Best Horror Stories: I”

    1. So, as I wait on inter-library loan to scratch my lit itch with Diane Williams' Excitability I figured I'd fire the first salvo in getting the YEAR'S BEST HORROR STORIES anthology series reviewed - sadly, I read all of these in the long-lived series (save a sparse few) before existed and so have no formal reviews - but, as always, I have my notes to guide me (it's worth saying I did not read these "as they came out", but scattershot - over the years - as I acquired them).And my notes tell me th [...]

    2. Late 60's, early 70's short stories on the murky borders of horror and science fiction. The advertising on this one tries to play it for the tuned-out crowd: "Our Annual Summer Chiller-Diller", the back cover states in bold. However, more traditional narratives wait within the pages. This first volume of the long-running series for DAW sets down a solid groove."Double Whammy" by Robert Bloch shows why he's the master of the slam-bang ending. Yet another carnival comes into town, but the twist in [...]

    3. Averages out to 3.35 stars, and I feel like that's probably accurate for my feelings on this anthology of horror stories. Like most short story compilations, it's a bit of a mixed bag thought mostly worthwhile. An entertaining read appropriate for Halloween-time. Double Whammy by Robert Bloch: 3/5Don't mess with gypsies.The Sister City by Brian Lumley: 3/5Ah, Lovecraftian horror. A pleasant surprise, but semi-disappointing ending. I think my ideal ending would be (view spoiler)[if it just turned [...]

    4. First published in 1971, the stories in this anthology seem a little dated. Two stories in particular seem to typify this datedness: "When Morning Comes" by Elizabeth Fancett and "The Hate" by Terri E. Pinckard. In the former story, it is the subject matter, abortion, that dates the story, and the tone of the story comes off as a bit of axe-grinding. In "The Hate," a manifestation of hatred terrorizes a woman, but when the source of the hatred was revealed, I felt let down. The source of hatred [...]

    5. Very enjoyable horror anthology from 1971. A very good year for horror, in general. This book's biggest highlight is that it collects the Richard Matheson story, "Prey" which was the basis for the Karen Black segment of the film TRILOGY OF TERROR. I've read quite a few Matheson collections and I don't recall ever coming across this one before. It's a bit darker than the film short. A short and sweet collection, one that is above par of most horror collections with only a couple of true duds in t [...]

    6. Really 2.5 stars, but the anthology did have a couple of classics and a few great stories I'd never read before. One should also take into consideration the period in which these stories were written - they probably read as more suspenseful/dark and less cheesy/naive back in the 1970s. An okay start to what would go on to become a terrific series of anthologies.

    7. This book contained about a dozen horror short stories that were deemed to be the best of 1970 by Editor, Richard Davis. I've always liked horror short stories and have read a lot of them. I get my fix of the macabre without having to read an entire book.

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