The Chief: Mistahimaskwa

The Chief Mistahimaskwa On her way to school one day Sarah is relieved to find the book she d dropped the day before shortly after an encounter with a bear But when she opens it the story within about the Cree chief Mista

  • Title: The Chief: Mistahimaskwa
  • Author: David Alexander Robertson Scott B. Henderson
  • ISBN: 9781553796596
  • Page: 335
  • Format: Paperback
  • On her way to school one day, Sarah is relieved to find the book she d dropped the day before shortly after an encounter with a bear But when she opens it, the story within, about the Cree chief Mistahimaskwa, comes alive It takes Sarah back to the Saskatchewan Plains of 1832, where the young boy who would become the great chief first learns the ways of his people, to thOn her way to school one day, Sarah is relieved to find the book she d dropped the day before shortly after an encounter with a bear But when she opens it, the story within, about the Cree chief Mistahimaskwa, comes alive It takes Sarah back to the Saskatchewan Plains of 1832, where the young boy who would become the great chief first learns the ways of his people, to the final days of his life.

    One thought on “The Chief: Mistahimaskwa”

    1. 'The Chief Mistahimaskwa' by David Alexander Roberson with art by Scott B. Henderson tells the story of a Cree chief of the Saskatchewan Plains in a graphic novel format. It succeeds and fails on a few different levels.There is a framing story about a girl named Sarah who has lost a book after an encounter with a bear. She later finds it and is taken into a living history version of the story in the book. We learn about Mistahimaskwa from the time he is little, all the way to his death. It's a g [...]

    2. Absolutely amazing. I loved everything about it. From the artwork to the very history lessons. It was nice getting to learn about one of the many Indigenous figures from Canadian history. Not only was this very educational, the phenomenal artwork made it very engaging and entertaining as well. Would recommend for everyone especially the younger generation.*ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*

    3. The Chief Mistahimaskwa is part of a graphic novel series geared towards educating people on Indigenous history in Canada. This particular book is about a young, Indigenous girl who is learning about Mistahimaskwa in school. Her book is accidentally hit by lightening, and this magically allows the text to visually show her what the history behind his man was really like.Mistahimaskwa was an important leader during the time when white Canadian colonizers were pressuring Indigenous groups to sign [...]

    4. I really enjoyed this! It's definitely written for middle grade kids in mind, so if reading YA is not your thing, I would give this a miss. I would definitely check it out if you are a teacher or are interested in teaching. As a preservice teacher I am always looking for ways to teach new content and I am certainly on the lookout for diverse material that presents multiple perspectives.I was pleased with this, I thought the formatting would be interesting for a middle grade student who needed to [...]

    5. Disclaimer: I received a free ecopy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.This one is pretty short. It tells the history of the Indian chief Mistahimaskwa. A girl's book is struck by lightning and the chief's story comes out of it for her to see. So, the way that she gets to see the story unfold is a little out there given that the rest of the story seems to be fairly historical.The chief is an impressive person. He is strong and brave, surviving situations that would overcome other peo [...]

    6. This graphic novel summarizes the life of Mistahimaskwa, one of the Cree Chiefs who tried to do what he felt was best for his people when the white man came to their land. He refused to sign the treaties, but when the buffalo disappeared and his people were starving, he gave in. He tried to reduce bloodshed during attacks, but eventually gave himself up and spent two years in prison. A good book to teach about this period in time and to give a snapshot of some of the historical facts. I had neve [...]

    7. It's hard for me to read books about indigenous peoples and not feel like it's wrong to own land. How do you take something previously unowned (and used freely by all) and decide to own it? At best it's theft. At worst it's a god complex leading to genocide. But it’s important for people to remember things that actually happened. This is from a series of graphic novels for middle schoolers about indigenous Americans from Canada’s history. This one tells the story of Cree chief Mistahimaskwa. [...]

    8. A copy of this book was generously provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I love the ability of books to educate, and comic books are no exception. I've read a few this year that deal with historical figures, and this is another one to add to that list. Knowing nothing of Big Bear, or anything about Native American history, I found this was a fantastic overview of his history, and I'm sure enough to spur others on to learn more.

    9. As the saying goes, to the victor goes the spoils and err the stories. This has been the narrative of western civilisation. Our history books are distorted with fanciful tales of the victor, tales that magnifies their exploits and obscure their questionable deeds. There are not a lot of voices from the point of view of the vanquished. The few voices that exist are faint as they are being drowned out by the mainstream stories. However, seeing a graphic novel that tries to tell a tale from an alte [...]

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