Icon, Vol. 1: A Hero's Welcome

Icon Vol A Hero s Welcome The flagship character from Milestone Comics is back in this new printing of the classic title collecting ICON This is the title that introduced Augustus Freeman a successful lawyer who covertly

  • Title: Icon, Vol. 1: A Hero's Welcome
  • Author: Dwayne McDuffie M.D. Bright Romeo Tanghal Reginald Hudlin
  • ISBN: 9781563893391
  • Page: 170
  • Format: Paperback
  • The flagship character from Milestone Comics is back in this new printing of the classic title collecting ICON 1 8 This is the title that introduced Augustus Freeman, a successful lawyer who covertly uses his alien super powers to help those in need But when a teenaged girl from the streets convinces him to use his abilities to inspire his people and becomes his sidekicThe flagship character from Milestone Comics is back in this new printing of the classic title collecting ICON 1 8 This is the title that introduced Augustus Freeman, a successful lawyer who covertly uses his alien super powers to help those in need But when a teenaged girl from the streets convinces him to use his abilities to inspire his people and becomes his sidekick, Rocket, the affluent Augustus embraces his true destiny and becomes Icon, the hero of Dakota.

    One thought on “Icon, Vol. 1: A Hero's Welcome”

    1. Although Static Shock has achieved more fame, Icon was one of my favorite comic books. Imagine Superman arrives in the USA in 1839 and takes the form of the first person who finds him and that person happens to be slave!Fast forward a 150 years and we have Augustus Freeman IV a conservative African American lawyer who reveals his powers to prevent a robbery of his home by a group of teens. One of those teens, Rachel, amends her ways and approaches Mr. Freeman about becoming an ICON for the Afric [...]

    2. Remarkably good. Reminds me of Alan Moore, but lends itself well to an ongoing episodic format. The basic premise is "What if Superman was raised by black slaves instead of the Kents?" The result is the superhero Icon, but he doesn't become a superhero until a young woman suggests it to him. She becomes his sidekick, Rocket. The characters are interesting and different, nodding toward the Superman origin but creating their own mythos with their own themes and topics. It does a great job of being [...]

    3. Icon isn't exactly timeless—it's clearly a product of the early to mid 1990s in many respects—but it was a surprisingly mature work, and of the many superhero universes that cropped up during that decade, the Milestone one was one of the better ones. It's certainly one of the few well wroth revisiting. The premise is basically "What if Superman were a black man?" and writer Dwayne McDuffie answers that question in a way that feels politically relevant without ever losing its sense of humor o [...]

    4. Never read this when it was being published originally. found it randomly at the library. i like it for the most partstranded alien disguised as black republican fights crime and other uh heroes of color while the sidekick deals with heady stuff (you know like abortion, nbd) makes this book way ahead of its time while also calling back to the more heavy handed "message" books of DC's 70s.i didn't like that the book had to cram in a MEET THE OTHER COMIC HEROES NOW FIGHT THEM, but this was written [...]

    5. I really enjoyed reading this, but I have some problems with the portrayal of Rocket. Yes, she's a PoC portrayed by other PoCs, but she's also a woman being portrayed by a group of men, which makes her character seem a little shallow. Also, there was a fair amount of really corny dialogue that disrupted the flow of the story.

    6. The flagship book of the Milestone line, Icon takes many elements from Superman (alien hero in cape) and expands on it. I enjoyed these first few issues of the book, and kind of wish it hadn't come out when I was taking a sabbatical from comics. I hope DC reprints the rest of the series.

    7. A smartly written superhero comic that seems ahead of it's time (1993). It really does deserve to be read by a wider audience.Reminds me of Kurt Busiek's Astro City .

    8. Interesting commentary on race and gender, but for some reason, I just didn't connect to the characters or the story as much as I thought I would.

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