Veterans' Affairs

Veterans Affairs Joey Sullivan a veteran of the Iraq War just got his nursing degree and is ready to start working with vets at a local hospital Things go wrong from day one however as he s contacted by the spirit

  • Title: Veterans' Affairs
  • Author: Joseph Hirsch
  • ISBN: 9781612966663
  • Page: 401
  • Format: Paperback
  • Joey Sullivan, a veteran of the Iraq War, just got his nursing degree and is ready to start working with vets at a local hospital Things go wrong from day one, however, as he s contacted by the spirits of dying vets who torment him in his dreams with memories of their horrific war experiences The spirits won t leave Joey alone until he agrees to help them check off the lJoey Sullivan, a veteran of the Iraq War, just got his nursing degree and is ready to start working with vets at a local hospital Things go wrong from day one, however, as he s contacted by the spirits of dying vets who torment him in his dreams with memories of their horrific war experiences The spirits won t leave Joey alone until he agrees to help them check off the last items on their bucket lists In the meantime Joey continues to struggle with his own memories of war, grappling with the aftermath of that fateful day when his friend triggered a bomb that blasted him to bits, and gave Joey a traumatic brain injury that might be responsible for the second sight that lets him commune with the spirits of the dying vets War may be hell, but things only get worse when you get home.

    One thought on “Veterans' Affairs”

    1. Joey Sullivan not only brought home a debilitating case of PTSD from Iraq, he also brought home something else. The ability to converse with the spirits of dying veterans. They haunt his dreams and will not leave him alone until he agrees to grant them favors that they can't do for themselves. What seemed like a very promising premise turned into a sometimes painful and tedious ordeal. Hirsch knows his stuff. There's no doubt. He's a veteran himself and it comes out in his story. Sometimes it co [...]

    2. In Veterans’ Affairs a vet comes home from Iraq with PTSD and a mild TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury). After making the decision to get back on his feet and get a job at the local VA hospital, he discovers that his TBI has opened him up to new experiences. That these experiences are ones he neither wants nor needs is beside the point. Finding himself at the mercy of things beyond his control, Joey is pushed to his limits and beyond. And still, they won’t let him rest. Veterans’ Affairs is a re [...]

    3. Joey Sullivan, RNwith a multitude of problemsJoey Sullivan fought in Iraq and was sent home with a mild TBI (traumatic brain injury) after a bomb exploded near him and killed a friend of his. After he got tired sitting around getting disability benefits, he went to school and became a Registered Nurse.He's an average guy, overweight, on a multitude of painkillers, tranquilizers and more and he loves his dog Tiffany. He now works at the VA hospital and starts being haunted by other veteran's war [...]

    4. Veterans' Affairs creates an authentic-feeling struggle of a damaged veteran trying to come back to life, and then takes that familiar type of story into a wondrously uncanny new dimension. It solidly grounds the reader, but also thrusts them into the unknown. Gratifying to read even when unpleasant, it gets a grip and hangs on ruthlessly.

    5. I received a free download of this book from Story Cartel, thank you!I generally am not a fan of books about war, and to be quite honest, I probably wouldn't have given this book a second look if it had not been written by Joseph Hirsch. I have read many of his books, and have enjoyed almost all of his work. I am glad I did not skip out on this one.The main character is a down-to-earth, likable guy. I wonder how much of him is autobiographical.Some of the descriptions of the war scenes were a li [...]

    6. You can't really go wrong with a Joseph Hirsch story. I started off thinking that it was weird, and very unlike Joseph – 50 pages in, and I had yet to see anything more than the implication of gore and blood. But as we arrive in 'Nam, the world changes, and I grew more comfortable that this was a Hirsch creation.Lovingly blending real-world elements, including the harsh realities of many different wars, the joy of family and the reassurance of a good dog, with some very mystical things that co [...]

    7. Joey Hirsch is my newest favorite author. Thankfully he's got quite a collection of books for me to plow through. Veterans Affairs was an intimate read that I couldn't put down. Like reading someone's diary, there was a mad rush to get through, a slight reservation about what you're even doing here, but that thrilling feeling of being inside someone's head. The pacing of the story was slow at times, but slow in a very realistic way. It was an all too familiar feeling of going throughout your lif [...]

    8. A strange and intriguing premise: Nurse Joseph Sullivan receives a traumatic brain injury while serving in Iraq, and is now able to tap into his patients' thoughts, even though he would prefer not to; he is transported back to Vietnam and to Japan to experience what these men did while they were in the military. I could see this book being transformed into a film, though I got the feeling that the story was unfinished, and there was more to tell.

    9. If war is hell, what is it like to experience the wars of other generations? This is a stunning and visceral piece of storytelling that takes you (as far as it can) face-to-face with the fear, bigotry and inequity of those who fought in wars for the powers that be. It reminded me of a mix of the film 'Jacob's Ladder' and my favourite novel of all time 'Master and Margerita'. Fantastic book.

    10. I usually don't take to books about war or ptsd. However I've always liked Hirsch's books, so I gave this a try. He's a wonderful writer who captures characters and situations that make it all seem real. I was good with the war scenes in spite of my aversion, because he makes it human. When I was young, I read some Mailer. Hirsch reminds me of same in the "you were there" sense. Hirsch has a wide range so I look forward to the next one.

    11. Incredible novel Joe, returning from his tour in Iraq is physically and psychologically traumatized. He finishes his schooling and begins his career as an R.N. in the VA Hospital. His TBI makes him an unwilling conduit for some of his Veteran patients. Told in the first person, it's a gritty sometimes painfully funny, work of art.

    12. I preferred Rolling Country even though it was a bit 'blokey,' Veterans' Affairs is definitely one for the blokes as well as a bit strange, and I don't mean the spiritual connections, just maybe the style of them. But, well written as usual with Joseph Hirsch.

    13. There are few if any heroes of a novel as damaged as Joey Sullivan. Yet as sad and downtrodden as Joey often is, he is a hero nonetheless. Hirsch's wacky imagination sends Sullivan on a wild ride into the dimension of ghosts with two equally damaged vets of wars past, and it's a lot of fun.

    14. I really don't feel comfortable with this book. There's too much autobiography in it, too much of my war experiences, as well. It is strange to write your most intimate thoughts down and then have them be published. It would actually be embarrassing for me if anyone I knew were to read my works. An indifferent world is, in many ways, my salvation and my muse.The plot, in brief: Joey Sullivan (my first and middle name, how creative of me) is a veteran of the war in Iraq who came home and used his [...]

    15. Alot of this book hit me in the feels being a Navy Veteran in the Gulf War. I do think that this book was more fictional in retrospect, but factual in biography of certain war and historical details. I myself have been brought back to life several times and there was nothing but darkness and peace before I was revived. Nothing else was a factor in my experience. I also have PTSD and TBI. I have lost most alot of my memory after my military career was tragically ended. I do see apparitions someti [...]

    16. Good readThe storyline was fresh and it made me feel as if I could understand what he went through. I'd recommend this book.

    17. “War may be hell, but things only get worse when you get home.” That sums up the ride that readers will take alongside Hirsch's protagonist.Joey Sullivan returns from Iraq wounded in body and soul. Struggling with PTSD and chronic pain, he defers suicide when he secures a RN position at the Cincinnati VA Medical Center. But his traumatic brain injury has created a conduit for dead soldiers from past wars to communicate to him. And they have unfinished business. Until Joey agrees to their ter [...]

    18. Joseph “Joey” Sullivan (Catholic, VA RN # 102, narrator, retired US Army, Iraq, U of C, “Porno Tits”) goes to work at the VA hospital to help other Vets.Trouble is he is not much better off than they are.Medical, Mental (PTSD), relationships, bucket lists a little bit of everything. Kind of cheesy. Wasn’t what I thought it was going to be. Quite bizarre actually. The next Mash. I am a retired US Army Veteran. I did not receive any type of compensation for reading & reviewing this b [...]

    19. Simply Brilliant! This is such an interesting and unique story. Joseph Hirsch has done a great job with not only the storyline, but the Characters as well. Joey Sullivan is a bit of a mess after surviving a bomb blast in Iraq. You know his hearts in the right place, and he’s trying to be normal, but that’s why he’s so easy to like. If I was having dreams like Joey is having, I don’t think I would want to go to sleep. His dreams of his tour in Iraq are bad enough, but when he starts to lo [...]

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