All Things Made New: The Reformation and Its Legacy

All Things Made New The Reformation and Its Legacy The most profound characteristic of Western Europe in the Middle Ages was its cultural and religious unity a unity secured by a common alignment with the Pope in Rome and a common language Latin for

  • Title: All Things Made New: The Reformation and Its Legacy
  • Author: Diarmaid MacCulloch
  • ISBN: 9780190616816
  • Page: 393
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The most profound characteristic of Western Europe in the Middle Ages was its cultural and religious unity, a unity secured by a common alignment with the Pope in Rome, and a common language Latin for worship and scholarship The Reformation shattered that unity, and the consequences are still with us today In All Things Made New, Diarmaid MacCulloch, author of the NeThe most profound characteristic of Western Europe in the Middle Ages was its cultural and religious unity, a unity secured by a common alignment with the Pope in Rome, and a common language Latin for worship and scholarship The Reformation shattered that unity, and the consequences are still with us today In All Things Made New, Diarmaid MacCulloch, author of the New York Times bestseller Christianity The First Three Thousand Years, examines not only the Reformation s impact across Europe, but also the Catholic Counter Reformation and the special evolution of religion in England, revealing how one of the most turbulent, bloody, and transformational events in Western history has shaped modern society.The Reformation may have launched a social revolution, MacCulloch argues, but it was not caused by social and economic forces, or even by a secular idea like nationalism it sprang from a big idea about death, salvation, and the afterlife This idea that salvation was entirely in God s hands and there was nothing humans could do to alter his decision ended the Catholic Church s monopoly in Europe and altered the trajectory of the entire future of the West.By turns passionate, funny, meditative, and subversive, All Things Made New takes readers onto fascinating new ground, exploring the original conflicts of the Reformation and cutting through prejudices that continue to distort popular conceptions of a religious divide still with us after five centuries This monumental work, from one of the most distinguished scholars of Christianity writing today, explores the ways in which historians have told the tale of the Reformation, why their interpretations have changed so dramatically over time, and ultimately, how the contested legacy of this revolution continues to impact the world today.

    One thought on “All Things Made New: The Reformation and Its Legacy”

    1. A stimulating collection of essays—not all “fit” perfectly together in a single volume, but those that focus on the English Reformation certainly hang together nicely. MacCulloch is known for reminding us that England really did have a Reformation and that there was really a Reformed church under Edward (obviously) and Elizabeth (still obvious, but not quite as much). No 19th via media distortions here. Nevertheless, another theme emerges slowly but significantly throughout these essays: t [...]

    2. Both for beginners, this follows on from Machullochs reformation history to offer sidelights, home in on points and analyse more obscure figures and points - it's interesting but a bit of a jumble and feels unfocused . Also, the author seems to place the legacy of the Reformation squarely within Anglicanism and the. Counter reformed Catholicism . Other denominations don't get a look in . The essay format gives room for a more opinionated look - while I prefer facts , he is witty and telling at t [...]

    3. a bit niche - some good early stuff on the reformation, especially as it happened in England. But it gets a bit bogged down in essays about Hooker and those who came after. It has some sharp insights, but maybe more a book to selectively dip into than read cover to cover.

    4. A rewarding readIf at times a little tedious, the book never failed to be rewarding with insight and wit. If you have enjoyed MacCulloch's writing you will enjoy these essays.

    5. A delightful, sumptuous and engaging collection of essays. An excellent bibliography with great footnotes. A must read for any student of Reformation studies.

    6. I gave up on this book after 25 pages. He mixes his opinions into the text of history and I started arguing with the opinions so I gave up.

    7. hard going at times, McVulloch explores the naure of Anglicanism. He shows how a diverse, reltively non-dogmatic religion arose in England that is flexible and adapys to change. Inspiring

    8. It is 20 years since MacCulloch's ground-breaking biography of Thomas Cranmer and he has not been idle since, with significant, not to see massive, books on the Reformation and the history of Christianity. A selection of his writings and reviews on all things Reformation therefore seems timely, if not overdue.This is, for the most part, an excellent volume which combines scholarship, humility and a good deal of wit. The first two parts are thoroughly entertaining and enlightening. I knew nothing [...]

    9. Diarmaid MacCulloch RevisitedPublished September 2016, this is a collection of essays and reviews that have been published separately. Here is MacCulloch at his best: erudition softened by wit and an appreciation of the theological enterprise as necessary, yet always inadequate, frequently corrupt, and sometimes deadly.

    10. A collection of essays on people and incidents surrounding the protestant reformation but mostly surrounding the English reformation. This gets into the weeds on the topic of the English reformation and the general reader like myself had something more introductory in mind but some of the stuff was interesting.

    11. Heavy scholarshipYet again the cover blurb misled me. This is a book of scholarship about aspects of the Reformation intended for other scholars of that important period in our history. And like most such books, to those who are merely interested in the topic in question, it is 'heavy lifting' to read, dull even.

    12. Intriguing, involving and accessible. MacCulloch writes in such an engaging way he makes his subject come alive with passion and fascinating detail.

    13. An interesting collection of essays on the Reformation, with a primary focus on England. They vary widely in length, focus, and tone. I found it fascinating to see what a top-notch historian thinks of the debates that shaped and continue to shape our prayer and worship.

    14. Een collectie essays over de Reformatie en dan vooral over die in Engeland. Bijzonder boeiend en het blijkt toch allemaal niet zo simple te zijn als wij het in de geschiedenisles leerden.

    15. Some essays were very interesting and others seemed to plod. McCulloch has a unique writing style that sometimes wore thin on me. I think the essays needed more context to help this reader understand what he was writing about. For example, whether he is writing about a recording or reviewing a book, what is the title, where was this essay originally published. A short paragraph of introduction to each essay would have helped me.

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