The Rolling Stones (Heinlein Juveniles #6)

The Rolling Stones Heinlein Juveniles One of Heinlein s best loved works The Rolling Stones follows the rollicking adventures of the Stone family as they tour the solar system It doesn t seem likely for twins to have the same middle name

  • Title: The Rolling Stones (Heinlein Juveniles #6)
  • Author: Robert A. Heinlein Tom Weiner
  • ISBN: B00K55F8E8
  • Page: 131
  • Format: Audible Audio
  • One of Heinlein s best loved works, The Rolling Stones follows the rollicking adventures of the Stone family as they tour the solar system It doesn t seem likely for twins to have the same middle name Even so, it s clear that Castor and Pollux Stone both have Trouble written in that spot on their birth certificates Of course, anyone who s met their grandmother Hazel wOne of Heinlein s best loved works, The Rolling Stones follows the rollicking adventures of the Stone family as they tour the solar system It doesn t seem likely for twins to have the same middle name Even so, it s clear that Castor and Pollux Stone both have Trouble written in that spot on their birth certificates Of course, anyone who s met their grandmother Hazel would know they came by it honestly Join the Stone twins as they connive, cajole, and bamboozle their way across the solar system in the company of the most high spirited and hilarious family in all of science fiction It all starts when the twins decide that life on the lunar colony is too dull and buy their own spaceship to go into business for themselves Before long they are headed for the furthest reaches of the stars, with stops on Mars, some asteroids, Titan, and beyond This lighthearted tale has some of Heinlein s sassiest dialogue not to mention the famous flat cats incident Oddly enough, it s also a true example of real family values, for when you re a Stone, your family is your highest priority 2009 Robert A Heinlein P 2014 Blackstone Audiobooks

    One thought on “The Rolling Stones (Heinlein Juveniles #6)”

    1. Heinlein's juveniles have always been among my favorite SF - I liked a lot of them more than some of his later novels written for adults. I read The Rolling Stones so long ago I barely remembered it, but some of it came back to me as I listened to it again as an audiobook.Alas, the years have diminished my fondness for this light-hearted space romp somewhat. While it was a fun adventure about a wisecracking, hyper-competent family of adventurers seeking their fortune (and something adventurous) [...]

    2. It doesn’t seem likely for twins to have the same middle name. Even so, it’s clear that Castor and Pollux Stone both have “Trouble” written in that spot on their birth certificates. Of course, anyone who’s met their grandmother Hazel would know they came by it honestly.Join the Stone twins as they connive, cajole, and bamboozle their way across the solar system in the company of the most high-spirited and hilarious family in all of science fiction. The Rolling Stones was our fantasy bo [...]

    3. My first Heinlein read. Fundamentally the story line is close to the Lost in Space television series of many years ago. The book is easy to read, and I highly recommend young readers take a look at how future space travel was viewed some 57 years ago. The book has valuable insights into family values, and dealing with nearly absolute isolation for long periods of time. And they did not have Game Boys!

    4. A lot of people seem to target Heinlein as juvenile and they colour their reviews based on a recent re-reading of these books. Even for the uninitiated new readers they will seem a bit clunky.But look at when these were written, this story was published before sputnik, before computers were really available beyond a few building filling giants, even IBM didn't exist ;)Read them for what they are, visions of a future far more remote than space seems now, read them as classics.I loved these books [...]

    5. The easiest way to describe this book is that it's an amusing family road trip in space.I've come to adore Heinlein's dry sense of humour, which often appears in one or two characters in his books, but here, we have a whole family of smartasses. From Captain to Doctor, to grandmother, to daughter, to entrepreneurial twins, and a determined little boy with typical little boy stubborness. Oh and flat cats, which are best described as, well, tribbles, but flatter.The description of this book focuse [...]

    6. This is a good, old-fashioned, family space opera. Clearly intended for a younger audience -this is one of Heinlein's juvenile series- a fun read nevertheless. I heard the audio book by Full Cast Audio, the same company that did Have Space Suit, Will Travel. It may even have been the same cast. They did a pretty good job, (On par with the cast at your local dinner theater) except for the youngest boy in the Stone family, who sounded like a little kid in The Simpsons cartoon show.Grandmother Haze [...]

    7. It's actually the book, not the audio cd but I like the cover art better.Oh, yeah. Back in days when planning a family vacation meant choosing between a Hohmann ellipse and a hyperbolic cometary orbit. Great fun for all the family. Even smells like an old library paperback at Hugo's if you get the super old copy.This contains the material that was stolen to make the Tribbles episode on the original Star Trek. Believe it or not.

    8. Here’s my latest re-read of Heinlein’s works. By 1952 we’re well into the so-called Heinlein juveniles – books published that were written by Heinlein predominantly for teenage Boy Scouts. After Between Planets, Heinlein was clearly on a roll, and in demand. The Introduction to this edition, written by Heinlein biographer William H Patterson, talks of his books selling well, and his movie Destination Moon doing quite well, though his work for TV series Tom Corbett Space Cadet had left hi [...]

    9. Originally posted at Fantasy Literature.Castor and Pollux Stone are 15-year-old red-headed twin boys who live in Luna City (a moon colony). They are young entrepreneurs and are making plans to buy a spaceship so they can start a trading business. When their father Roger Stone, a retired engineer and former mayor of Luna City whose current job is to write cheesy sci-fi stories for a television show, finds out about their plans, he decides to buy a space yacht and take the whole family on a trip. [...]

    10. Ahh, so THIS book is where Hazel Stone is from. I really should not have read The Cat Who Walks Through Walls before working my way through Heinlein's bibliography. The Rolling Stones is a fun space romp, about a family from Luna that decides to buy a spaceship and cruise around. It has requisite Heinlein characters: twin genius boys, a father who impresses upon them the glory, beauty, and absolute necessity of mathematics, a surgeon mother who still manages to play good housewife, a sharp witte [...]

    11. Listened to this book on a long car ride. What a fun booka full cast of readers and music made this audio book especially fun! Even though this book was considered juvenile fiction and my husband had read it as a teen, we still enjoyed it! As we listened we were able to guess where many future story lines originated! "Flat cats" and tribbles??? Family traveling in space and Space Family Robinsons?? As usual, though this book was written about 57 years ago, Heinlein spoke of many concepts/ideas/c [...]

    12. The Rolling Stones is one of Heinlein's finer juveniles. I'm looking forward in a year or two to introducing my youngest, currently 4 years old, to Heinlein through this book.As always, Heinlein's flare for creating wonderful characters shines through. Typical of the early works, the plot is gripping and set against a backdrop of space travel. It is always a pleasure to encounter Hazel (Mead) Stone who is a recurring character in one of the universes that Heinlein creates, though startling (even [...]

    13. I'm not clear what people mean by 'adventure', if they don't count this. I picked up quite a few things from this, like the design for a space scooter in the Asteroids, and the utility of bicycles on Mars.Hazel Stone, mentioned in other reviews as included in The Cat Who Walks through Walls, is also found (as a very young girl) in The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress.This book was originally published under the title Space Family Stone.David Gerrold, author of The Trouble with Tribbles, has admitted tha [...]

    14. It has all the classic elements of a good RAH juvenile novel: Does not talk down to youths, good family values, strong male and female roles I just didn't get into it as much as some of the others; some of the characters were a bit annoying - that's family I guess- yet overall it was a fine novel.

    15. A delightfully fun book about a pair of brilliant and mouthy teenagers and their space-traveling family. Lots of adventures, with a bit of Heinlein-esque education thrown in here and there. A look forward to space travel of about our time, from the great "depths" of the 1950s. I've read it over and over, most recently in 2008.

    16. Heinlein's romp around the solar system with the Stone family is a fun read for a teen. Even for an adult it makes a great re-read to recapture that sense of anything being possible.

    17. Pretty much the foundation for everything that came afterward in Heinlein's universe. A half century later, still mostly right on the mark.

    18. This is one of Heinlein's best titles. He himself realized Hazel, the grandmother, was an excellent character and used her again in other stories. She was originated in The Moon is a Harsh Mistress but became a major character in this one. The twins, who are the main characters are well developed as well. Actually, every single character is memorable, right down to a crazy old coot named Charlie. Heinlein also created one of his best alien animals in this book: flat cats. Superficially, they wou [...]

    19. The intelligent, independent, and colorful Stone family, one of the founding families of the Luna Colony, sets off on a trip to Mars and encounters all manner of adventure along the way. This solid book of space travel is a great example of why Robert Heinlein is still a major name in Science Fiction.According to Genreflecting, The Rolling Stones is primarily a Space Travel Science Fiction novel (223-4), as the story is centered on the Stone family’s trip through the solar system. Herald actua [...]

    20. Castor and Pollux Stone have big plans to make big money. But in order to complete these plans, they need a spaceship, and the chance to fly it. Only their father doesn't quite see it their way, and would prefer that the underage twins finish their educations on earth. They soon strike a compromise. The twins can go to space, but not alone. The whole family is joining them from Mars, to the asteroids.The Rolling Stones is admittedly a strange choice for someone's second Heinlein book (my first w [...]

    21. Heinlein's earlier stories were written long before actual space travel became possible - when we started to actually put people in space his stories treated space travel with techno babble, handwavium, and unobtainium.The Rolling Stones was written before 1960, and Heinlein speculates a bit about space travel. In retrospect (from 66 years in the future, now, but even at the time I first read this story in the late 1970s) his speculating is naive. But if you're OK with treating that part of the [...]

    22. While rightly classified as one of Heinlein's juveniles, this book has a lot more sophistication than his older "Boy Scouts in Space" style tales. It's got wit, intrigue, some entertaining family dynamics, and some decent (if a bit outdated) crunchy SF to go with it. Unlike most of the juveniles, Heinlein spends plenty of time on all the members of the family, not just the young protagonists, and the relationship between all of them -- where they conflict, where they complement, and where they d [...]

    23. The family Stone goes Rolling across the solar system to see what they can see. Tough and wise Grandma Hazel, Captain and Doctor Stone, daughter Meade, irascible twins Castor and Pollux, and baby Lowell have all kinds of interesting adventures in space. Despite the excess of mathematics and ballistics, this is a very readable and exciting tale. Taking place a few decades after the revolt of Luna in “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress”, we are able to infer how the Free State has matured, and also [...]

    24. It doesn’t seem likely for twins to have the same middle name. Even so, it’s clear that Castor and Pollux Stone both have "Trouble" written in that spot on their birth certificates. Of course, anyone who’s met their grandmother Hazel would know that they came by it honestly… Join the Stone twins as they connive, cajole, and bamboozle their way across the Solar System in the company of the most high-spirited and hilarious family in all of science fiction. This light-hearted tale has some [...]

    25. This story gathers no moss.The Rolling Stones moves along at a good clip. Castor and Pollux are two smart, scheming youngsters who got rich from their invention of a better spacesuit breather valve. They and their family buy their own rocket ship, leaving Luna City for Mars and points beyond. The situations they get themselves into (including one that was the inspiration for the beloved Star Trek episode The Trouble with Tribbles) are non-stop, but by keeping their wits about them, they usually [...]

    26. One of Heinlein's juveniles. A rollicking romp from the moon and beyond with the eccentric Stone family, mom, dad the twins and grandma.Various adventures and encounters come their way. This is a juvenile so very light, quick read, and a bit dated from 1952. I have enjoyed some of his other juveniles better.

    27. 1950's classic sci-fi adventure. Take the Cunningham family, and send them on an aimless vacation in space.

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