Seven Seasons of Buffy: Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers Discuss Their Favorite Television Show

Seven Seasons of Buffy Science Fiction Fantasy Writers Discuss Their Favorite Television Show This collection of irreverent and surprising essays about the popular television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer includes pieces by leading science fiction and fantasy authors Contributors include bes

  • Title: Seven Seasons of Buffy: Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers Discuss Their Favorite Television Show
  • Author: Glenn Yeffeth David Brin Justine Larbalestier Jennifer Crusie Marguerite Krause Sarah Zettel Charlaine Harris Jacqueline Lichtenberg
  • ISBN: 9781932100082
  • Page: 419
  • Format: Paperback
  • This collection of irreverent and surprising essays about the popular television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer includes pieces by leading science fiction and fantasy authors Contributors include bestselling legend David Brin, critically acclaimed novelist Scott Westerfeld, cult favorite vampire author Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, and award winner Sarah Zettel The show and itsThis collection of irreverent and surprising essays about the popular television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer includes pieces by leading science fiction and fantasy authors Contributors include bestselling legend David Brin, critically acclaimed novelist Scott Westerfeld, cult favorite vampire author Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, and award winner Sarah Zettel The show and its cast are the topics of such critical pieces as Lawrence Watt Evans s Matchmaking in Hellmouth and Sherrilyn Kenyon s The Search for Spike s Balls An informed introduction for those not well acquainted with the show, and a source of further research for Buffy buffs, this book raises interesting questions concerning a much loved program and future cult classic.

    One thought on “Seven Seasons of Buffy: Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers Discuss Their Favorite Television Show”

    1. Why read: Received for review.What impressed me: Many authors I had read, or at least heard of, contributed essays to Seven Seasons of Buffy. I didn't agree with everything the essayists put forth, but appreciated the contrasting opinions that made me consider other outlooks. This book is a celebration of everything that Buffy was, but doesn't hold back when presenting theories and ideas that show fans may rabidly disagree with.What disappointed me: With any anthology of this nature, some essays [...]

    2. You really can't go wrong with sci-fi and fantasy authors giving their take on what makes/made Buffy the cult production that it came to be.The authors delve into everything from Buffy's single status to whether or not the Scoobies should be insiders or outsiders in the world of normal people. If you thought you were the only one dissecting the Buffyverse and how it might relate to your life. again! It seems like it's the trendy thing to do!

    3. An interesting collection of essays about Buffy. A bit too focused on Angel or Spike, but I did particularly like the essay "When did the Scoobies become Insiders?" by Sarah Zettel which talked about how the Scoobies moved from outsiders to insiders over the course of the series and how that affected the show. I've read better written and more critical essays, but it was a fun read. Good for any Buffy fan.

    4. A few of the articles were spot-on, in my opinion, and a few missed the mark, but in that way that I can respectfully disagree with. So why didn't I enjoy it more? I guess maybe it hasn't aged well, I don't know, but I found myself skimming more articles than I usually would.

    5. You can find more reviews @BloodyBookaholicAre you the kind of Buffy fan that declares that Buffy was the ultimate T.V. Series? Are you the kind of Buffy fan that bought the series and watched it over and over and over again? Are you the kind of fan that discusses with your fellow Buffy mates various points of the series? Like what went wrong, what went great, and things like that? If you answered yes to any of these questions then this IS the book for you. This book will give you plenty of thin [...]

    6. I've been a Buffy fan since the early years and at one point in time, I might have been one of those crazed fans that collected all things Buffy, but my love for the TV series waned with the start of season four, not only because Angel left (I personally might have cried when he left at the end of season 3, even knowing that he was getting his own show the next season, yet I never really wanted Angel and Buffy together as I thought that he deserved better.) but because of the show just seemed so [...]

    7. As always, when reading a collection from many different contributors, it's impossible to like them all equally. My favorite essays were written by Roxanne Longstreet Conrad (loved her frisky creativity), Scott Westerfeld (his ideas about story types intrigued me), Laura Resnick (liked her writing and it rang true to me), Justine Larbalestier (really loved her voice and her "festival" ideas), Kevin Andrew Murphy (interesting behind-the-scenes info about making the show), Christie Golden (another [...]

    8. Since finishing Buffy and Angel I've become a voracious reader of Buffyverse academia and have enjoyed most of it. I read the companion book Five Seasons of Angel and loved it. It was clever and well-written. It was with high expectations that I read Seven Seasons of Buffy, and was sadly, quite disappointed. First, this essay compilation needs a much better editor. Basic information about the show was incorrect, at least one character's name was misspelled, and a couple of essays suffer from far [...]

    9. A lot of the essays in this book start getting samey. The power of friendship, sexiness of vampires, who should Buffy be with, wiccan good, love the earth, woman power. It starts feeling like refined versions of online editorials, only by professional authors.And that's saying something because, unlike most things, I did not lurk on Buffy web sites. I didn't read the analyses or identify with a main character or get into discussion groups. Mostly because I wanted to avoid spoilers, but because I [...]

    10. First off, I admit I didn't read this book cover to cover. I just hopped around chapters as the mood grabbed me. The fact this book even exists seems ludicrous, 23 well-established authors writing about a TV series?! You'd think they'd run out of wise insights or issues to discuss. But, as fans of Buffy know, they don't run out of topics to passionately discuss. And THAT is the beauty of this show. My "Buffy knowledge" dwarfs in comparison, but several times while reading I realized, "Hey, that' [...]

    11. Since I'm re-watching Buffy currently with my fella, who has never seen it, I found this especially delightful to re-read. It also let me look forward to reaching S7, which I don't think I've watched since it originally aired as I didn't enjoy it as much as Seasons 1-6 (and especially not as much as seasons 2-5, the best Buffy years, imho). I'll be glad to remember how it all shakes out and re-experience it, especially now that this book has helped me remember some of that joy. As always, the es [...]

    12. I really enjoyed this book. My friend Mark and I are doing a Buffy, the Vampire Slayer podcast, and I am reading pretty much any Buffy book I can get my hands on. This was a fun compilation of science fiction and fantasy writers, lovers of Buffy all, who wrote about particular themes or characters. I took so many notes. Why can't I be rich? This is one of those books that I wish I had my own copy of. I'll be doing a lot of xeroxing. The book gave me terrific ideas for themes to discuss on the po [...]

    13. It is fascinating to see other peoples' opinions on this show and the meanings behind it. A few of the essays were hard to swallow; I felt they were too harsh and did not supply realistic views. To quote Ms. Larbelestier, "Don't they WANT to enjoy the show?"I was intrigued by Matchmaking on the Hellmouth. Having seen the first four seasons of Angel, I can actually see it working with the Rogue Demon Hunter. *sigh* But alas we shall never see how that would have played out And, I'm sorry, but no [...]

    14. This is a collection of essays written about BTVS by other famous science-fiction and fantasy authors, including Sherrilyn Kenyon and Charlaine Harris, among others. An entertaining and informative read that I would recommend to any Buffy fan. I only have two complaints - some of the essays got to be repetitive after a while (many of the essays delved into Buffy's love interests), and it's not terribly well-edited. I noticed quite a few grammatical and formatting errors, as well as misnumbered e [...]

    15. This book is a collection of essays from various writers, especially in the SF, Fantasy and Romance genres, on various ideas and themes portrayed in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. What I read was brilliant and I only didn't finish it because my life is so busy and I needed to return the book to the owner so the long line of friends who want to read it get the chance. I'll get it back again when the queue is shorter.[Copied across from Library Thing; 27 September 2012]

    16. Most of these essays are on the silly side, intentionally or not. The only writer I'd actually read before was Sarah Zettel and I liked her essay that made some sense of the difference between the high school seasons and the post high school seasons - why the latter didn't work as well. I haven't been watching reruns, but it will probably be fun in a few years after memory has faded. (January 17, 2005)

    17. I was surfing Jennifer Cruisie's site and came across the short story from this book which I had never heard of before this. Out to the library I went and I have been browsing the book for a couple of days now. It's making me nostalgic for the series and now want to go out and get the 7 seasons on DVD. Didn't end up reading every story in this but enjoyed most of the ones I did.

    18. Although a few of the essays were fluffy, some of them were excellent. On the whole, I found the quality of What Would Buffy Do by Jana Riess and Why Buffy Matters by Rhonda Wilcox to be more consistent.

    19. A series of essays on a show I never watched when it was on but a friend got me to marathon on DVD. I liked that some people were just as critical about aspects of the show as I was and I liked the differing points of view. A few were a bit dry.

    20. A hit and miss book, but better than any other movie/TV show essay book I've read. The Scott Westerfeld essay "A Slayer Comes to Town: An Essay on Buffy the Vampire Slayer" is excellent and will make you think about SciFi differently.

    21. The essays in this book vary in quality, but provide an enjoyable summary of the myriad ways in which Buffy the Vampire Slayer endeared itself to its fans. Highlights include essays by Scott Westerfeld and Justine Larbalestier.

    22. This is a must for any Buffy fan. I was surprised, impressed, and entertained by the quality of writing and analysis. If you love Buffy and you want to understand not only why you love the show but also how it has helped construct the zeitgeist, this is one book, you shouldn't be without.

    23. This took me awhile to get through since the writing was so packed with ideas. I didn't feel like I could just sit and read the whole thing through in one sitting. Each essay needed some contemplation before moving on to the next.

    24. Pretty hit or miss collection of essays about BTVS. I would have liked it more if all the essays had the more scholarly slant that only some possessed. Did not quite fill my BTVS void.

    25. It's not often you find an anthology (non-fiction, still called that?) with 90% good essays. Highly entertaining read for between books, and now I want to go watch my favorite episodes again. :)

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