The Early Papacy: To the Synod of Chalcedon in 451

The Early Papacy To the Synod of Chalcedon in Adrian Fortescue a British apologist for the Catholic faith in the early part of the th century wrote this classic of clear exposition on the faith of the early Church in the papacy based upon the

  • Title: The Early Papacy: To the Synod of Chalcedon in 451
  • Author: Adrian Fortescue
  • ISBN: 9781586171766
  • Page: 302
  • Format: Paperback
  • Adrian Fortescue, a British apologist for the Catholic faith in the early part of the 20th century, wrote this classic of clear exposition on the faith of the early Church in the papacy based upon the writings of the Church fathers until 451 No ultramontanist, Fortescue can be a keen critic of personal failings of various Popes, but he shows through his brilliant assessmeAdrian Fortescue, a British apologist for the Catholic faith in the early part of the 20th century, wrote this classic of clear exposition on the faith of the early Church in the papacy based upon the writings of the Church fathers until 451 No ultramontanist, Fortescue can be a keen critic of personal failings of various Popes, but he shows through his brilliant assessment of the writings of the Church fathers that the early Church had a clear understanding of the primacy of Peter and a belief in the divinely given authority of the Pope in matters of faith and morals Referring to the famous passage in Matthew 16 18 where Jesus confers his authority upon Peter as the head of the Apostles, and the first Pope, Fortescue says that, while Christians can continue to argue about the exact meaning of that passage from Scripture, and the various standards that are used for judgments about correct Christian teaching and belief, the only possible real standard is a living authority, an authority alive in the world at this moment, that can answer your difficulties, reject a false theory as it arises and say who is right in disputed interpretations of ancient documents Fortescue shows that the papacy actually seems to be one of the clearest and easiest dogmas to prove from the early Church And it is his hope through this work that it will contribute to a ressourcement with regard to the office of the papacy among those in communion with the Bishop of Rome, and that it will assist those outside this communion to seek it out, confident that it is willed by Christ for all who would be joined to him in this life and in the next.

    One thought on “The Early Papacy: To the Synod of Chalcedon in 451”

    1. "[T]he papacy seems one of the clearest and easiest dogmas to prove from [the] early Church." This is the thesis Fr. Fortescue sets out to establish by looking at sources from the early Church from Christ to 451, the Synod of Chalcedon. He culls together sources that establish his thesis. He makes a persuasive, albeit polemical argument (this is likely a function of the time he was writing (1920)). I recommend this book for a good basic read of some of the early sources establishing papal primac [...]

    2. This book was a fascinating read. Fortescue wrote this book shortly after WWI, when man was horrified by his own capabilities. He was responding to those who were saying what the Cathlolic Church would need to give up if we were going to have a reunited Christianity. Much like today, the central focus was the Papacy.Most critics cite the Council of Chalcedon as being the "beginning" of the Popes. Not so, teaches the Catholic Church, and Fortescue aims to prove it. But first, he makes a few point [...]

    3. Extremely logical thesis on the earliest years of the Catholic Church until the year 451 A.D.This book has helped me view, understand, appreciate, and realize the magnitude of Apostolic succession. Brilliant writer and one who objectively approaches a topic which is normally filled with emotion, personal baggage, and selfish desires.He shows that logic can tell us a tremendous amount about the earliest moments of the Church - The Roman Catholic Church - one from the fisherman's hands of Peter.

    4. An informative and short justification of the claims made by the Papacy. While written mainly for Anglicans, a useful, nuanced, and sometimes witty text for both Christians and Non-Christians alike.

    5. This books makes a strong case for the leadership of the Bishop of Rome over the rest of the christian world. The model of the papacy is similar to the one that is currently in power today. It does show that churches had more autonomy however and while the Bishop of Rome had supreme authority it was not used as much in practice.

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