The Greenback Era: A Social and Political History of American Finance, 1865-1879

The Greenback Era A Social and Political History of American Finance None

The Greenback Era The Greenback Era A Social and Political History of American Finance, is a book by American historian Irwin Unger, published in by Princeton University Press, which won the Pulitzer Prize for History It is about American finance in the post Civil War period and the social and political elements involved. The Greenback Era A Social and Political History of The essence of Irwin Unger s The Greenback Era the winner of the Pulitzer Prize in history is that the motivations of the hard and soft money supporters of the post Civil War period are nuanced than Charles Beard and other leading American historians would have you believe. The Greenback Era A Social and Political History of I read this book because the whole greenback debate of the late nineteenth century continued to baffle me The fact that one of the most important political issues of the era could involve the merits of silver over gold, or of greenbacks over national bank notes, or even esoteric issues like convertible bonds and species principle repayment, seemed incredible. The Greenback Era A Social and Political History of The Greenback Era is not a financial history rather, it is an attempt to locate the source of political power in the crucial Reconstruction years through a socio economic study of American financial conflict during the years to Originally published in . The Greenback Era A Social And Political History Of Auto Suggestions are available once you type at least letters Use up arrow for mozilla firefox browser alt up arrow and down arrow for mozilla firefox browser alt down arrow to review and enter to select. The Greenback Era A Social and Political History of The Greenback Era is conceived as a great deal than merely a study of a phase of American financial history The financial conflict, ac cording to Unger, sheds light on the locus of control of political power in the decade after the Civil War, and he is largely concerned with the Irwin Unger, The Greenback Era Yamaguchy The Greenback Era A SOCIAL, AND POLITICAL HISTORY OF AMERICAN FINANCE, BY IRWIN UNGER PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS THE HARD MONEY INTEREST Rutherford Hayes, that the overthrow of the greenback heresy is really an event of national and historic import Customer reviews The Greenback Era A Social Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Greenback Era A Social and Political History of American Finance, at Read The Civil War and Greenbacks Gold standard The Civil War and Greenbacks the War both its duration and its cost Just as dangerous, perhaps, Chase overestimated the usefulness of Jackson era financial policies to deal with the crisis set off a wild speculative bubble in Wall Street as the value of the greenback in terms of gold gyrated in response to Union victories and Greenback s money In it declined again as Grant was making little progress against Lee who held strong in Richmond throughout most of the war The Greenback s low point came in July of that year greenbacks equal to gold When the war ended in April the greenback made another remarkable recovery to .

  • Title: The Greenback Era: A Social and Political History of American Finance, 1865-1879
  • Author: Irwin Unger
  • ISBN: 9781597401685
  • Page: 144
  • Format: Hardcover
  • None

    One thought on “The Greenback Era: A Social and Political History of American Finance, 1865-1879”

    1. I read this book because the whole greenback debate of the late nineteenth century continued to baffle me. The fact that one of the most important political issues of the era could involve the merits of silver over gold, or of greenbacks over national bank notes, or even more esoteric issues like "convertible bonds" and "species principle repayment," seemed incredible. Yet here it all is. In this book Unger convincingly shows that the whole nation WAS seriously caught up in abstruse debates abou [...]

    2. This book is excessively dry which makes it nearly impossible to keep your attention long enough to actually understand the big picture of the Greenback debate in the late 19th Century, much less the minutiae of it. Not only that, but it seems like the conclusion of the book is that after years of debates, not much really happened. Really? That is the money shot (pun intended) after 480 long pages? Ugh.Now it's possible that I am somehow misinterpreting the conclusion because I spent the majorit [...]

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