Marching Through Georgia

Marching Through Georgia As Jerry Ellis walked from Atlanta to Savannah the trail so demolished by the Civil War he examined the scars left by the war and set out to answer questions about what it means to be Southern For th

  • Title: Marching Through Georgia
  • Author: Jerry Ellis
  • ISBN: 9780385311847
  • Page: 328
  • Format: Paperback
  • As Jerry Ellis walked from Atlanta to Savannah the trail so demolished by the Civil War he examined the scars left by the war, and set out to answer questions about what it means to be Southern For the legions of readers who enjoy books about the Civil War, Sherman, and the South, Marching Through Georgia is part travelogue, part American history, and part roadside philAs Jerry Ellis walked from Atlanta to Savannah the trail so demolished by the Civil War he examined the scars left by the war, and set out to answer questions about what it means to be Southern For the legions of readers who enjoy books about the Civil War, Sherman, and the South, Marching Through Georgia is part travelogue, part American history, and part roadside philosophy.

    One thought on “Marching Through Georgia”

    1. Pretty amusing book that would appeal to people who like travel books, Civil War history and social history. Ellis hikes along the same route that Sherman's army marched in 1864. Along the way, he explains what happened in 1864 and meets many of the charming locals, who he interviews and gets their perception on the impact of Sherman's March. If you ever wondered why the South still thinks it didn't lose the Civil War, this book will help you answer the question.

    2. Marching Through Georgia: My Walk With Sherman by Jerry Ellis (Delacorte Press 1995)(917.5804). Jerry Ellis is known for taking long walks on historical paths and trails and writing about the journey. Here he explores the path taken by the bastard Union General William Tecumseh Sherman across Georgia during the Civil War. My rating: 7/10, finished 2007.

    3. Fascinating look at Sherman's march -- both historically and from a modern perspective. I love William Tecumseh Sherman. I can see why Grant relied so heavily on him. He was a brilliant tactician.

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