The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition

The Slave s Cause A History of Abolition Received historical wisdom casts abolitionists as bourgeois mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism Manisha Sinha overturns this image broadening her scope be

  • Title: The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition
  • Author: Manisha Sinha
  • ISBN: 9780300181371
  • Page: 126
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Received historical wisdom casts abolitionists as bourgeois, mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved foundReceived historical wisdom casts abolitionists as bourgeois, mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor Drawing on extensive archival research, including newly discovered letters and pamphlets, Sinha documents the influence of the Haitian Revolution and the centrality of slave resistance in shaping the ideology and tactics of abolition This book is a comprehensive new history of the abolition movement in a transnational context It illustrates how the abolitionist vision ultimately linked the slave s cause to the struggle to redefine American democracy and human rights across the globe.

    One thought on “The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition”

    1. Save for a few narrow quarters such as the alt-right and Confederate apologists, the abolition of slavery is regarded almost by all as a high point in American political history. More ambivalent, however, is historical opinion of the abolitionists themselves. Some historians may have charitably described them as well-meaning but ineffectual, while others saw them as rootless agitators. Sinha's approach differs from all these - she offers a comprehensive (almost overwhelming at times) and rehabil [...]

    2. This is a really well-written history of abolitionism which centers the struggles and organizing of black abolitionists, fugitives, and rebels and does much to argue for the profound radicalism of the abolitionist project.

    3. Comprehensive and engaging long history of abolition that leaves (practically) no stone unturned. A fine testament to Sinha's decade of research and the studies of abolitionism that came before her. Firmly centers African Americans at the center of the narrative, reminding readers that they played the most important part in the movement. Perhaps too smooth of a narrative (it has a tendency to gloss over conflicts, slow progress, and schisms), it nonetheless sets out to prove that abolition was a [...]

    4. A really valuable and substantial contribution to the literature on abolition, that does a great job uniting all the different strains of the movement in one place. In particular, I really appreciate the way Manisha Sinha joins the work of black and white abolitionists, her coverage of colonization, and the portion about the international abolition movement and connections between American abolitionists and anti-imperial activism. This is a valuable corrective to a lot of notions about abolition [...]

    5. This is THE book about abolitionism. From beginning to end with all the detail you could possibly find time to read. Her basic premise was that the freed blacks as well as the enslaved themselves were the primary part of the abolition movement. Without their support, thru revolts, runaways, social organizations, passive resistance, economic help, any anti-slavery attempt by the white establishment meant very little to the demise of slavery. A very tedious read but if you are interested in the su [...]

    6. Manisha Sinha wrote a masterful history of the movement to abolish slavery. She argues that anti-slavery was shaped and influenced by slave revolts, radical abolition, and black abolitionists. She tracks the history of the movement from the colonial period, through the American Revolution, the early national period, up to the Civil War. This book will definitely re-shape how I teach this topic in my US history survey course.

    7. Well-researched and I liked the emphasis on Black abolitionism. However, I found the writing awfully dry and the book required a lot of focus, so it was slow going.

    8. " Sinha’s history of the abolition movement is rich and comprehensive, even to a fault. The movement unfolded over the course of a century in the cities, small towns, and countryside of the Northern states, and she aspires to cover it all. It certainly was an extended “drama in law, politics, literature and on-the-ground activism,” as she says; but for the most part, the drama of human struggle in the movement gets buried beneath the book’s encyclopedic level of detail. Sinha’s defa [...]

    9. Three star read rounding to four because the research here is incredible. There's a ton packed in here, but it felt overwhelming at times and somewhat dry. A terrific book for an academic, but a bit difficult for those reading for learning on their own.

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