Strange Fruit #1

Strange Fruit It s in the town of Chatterlee Mississippi drowned by heavy rains The Mississippi River is rising threatening to break open not only the levees but also the racial and social divisions of thi

  • Title: Strange Fruit #1
  • Author: J.G. Jones Mark Waid
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 429
  • Format: None
  • It s 1927 in the town of Chatterlee, Mississippi, drowned by heavy rains The Mississippi River is rising, threatening to break open not only the levees, but also the racial and social divisions of this former plantation town A fiery messenger from the skies heralds the appearance of a being, one that will rip open the tensions in Chatterlee Savior, or threat It dependsIt s 1927 in the town of Chatterlee, Mississippi, drowned by heavy rains The Mississippi River is rising, threatening to break open not only the levees, but also the racial and social divisions of this former plantation town A fiery messenger from the skies heralds the appearance of a being, one that will rip open the tensions in Chatterlee Savior, or threat It depends on where you stand Two of the industry s most respected and prolific creators come together for the first time in a deeply personal passion project J.G Jones 52, Wanted, Y The Last Man and Mark Waid Irredeemable, Superman Birthright, Kingdom Come take on a powerful, beautifully painted story set during the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 Strange Fruit is a challenging, provocative examination of the heroic myth confronting the themes of racism, cultural legacy, and human nature through a literary lens, John Steinbeck s classic novel, Of Mice and Men.

    One thought on “Strange Fruit #1”

    1. Warning: This post will probably make people uncomfortable, annoy them, or make them tell me that I'm being overly sensitive or political about race issues. >< SoI was a bit leery of this book, even before picking it up, because, let's be honest, as great of creators as Mark Waid and J.G. Jones are, they're two white dudes writing about racism (against African Americans) in the Depression-era US. I need to do a better search of the internet to see if they provided acceptable responses for [...]

    2. Norman Rockwell meets Superman, meets Something Else EntirelyNote - I believe I got 1-4, so this is a review on the series as a whole. Which is superb.Great art, and a powerful narrative push this tale forward. It’s 1927 – waaaay before Civil Rights, way before Martin Luther King, way before the KKK was considered a bad thing. It’s about to flood in Mississippi, and tensions are high all around.You’ve got the KKK, you’ve got sympathetic whites, and you’ve got the black underclass. Th [...]

    3. This review can also be found on my blog: graphicnovelty2/2018/01/0I was encouraged to read this book by my trusted Graham Crackers comic book store staff. Their synopsis: what if a black Superman landed in the segregated South during the 1920’s? They have never steered me wrong with my purchases, and I was intrigued at how a superhero origin story could be upended by racism. In fact the title of the book is based off the song made famous by Billie Holiday, Strange Fruit, which is about lynchi [...]

    4. osrascunhos/2017/10/13/stStrange fruit é o título de uma das canções mais arrepiantes de sempre. Arrepiante porque na aparente estranheza do título escondem-se horrorosos episódios da história americana. A letra foi escrita por um professor judeu como protesto contra o racismo americano, que na época, dava origem inúmeros linchamentos, referindo-se “frutas estranhas” aos corpos de homens afro-americanos que ficavam pendurados nas árvores. O poema foi adaptado para música com a voz [...]

    5. Strange Fruit (Hardcover)J.G. Jones, Mark WaidGood graphics and a worthwhile subject. But, a black superman from outer space, who saves the town and plantations from flooding, seems to have no lasting effect on the practices or values of white or black citizens. Maybe there would be less racism if the town had been wiped away.

    6. Chatterlee, Mississippi 1927: The great river is flooding the area as it overcomes the levees, and a strange visitor crash lands in the persisting mud. The tall alien black man nicknamed Johnson gives hope to the black sharecroppers in the area as the Klan continues to try and run the black labor force out of town, despite the rising water (and their own best interest in getting the community to reinforce the levees together). At first, I didn't know what to make of the art. It has a very washed [...]

    7. More issues with the rather boring story, but I'm thoroughly amused with the use of the Confederate flag.

    8. Gutsy. Two white dudes tackling a time and place that they ought to know nothing about. But wait! The art is lush. J.G Jones's paint is a treat to drink in. Waid's setting is strong. 1920s south. A levee will break. All hands NEED to be on deck to tame the Mississippi but townsfolk playing to stereotype will only spell doom. It's suffocating as a reader to follow Sonny, our protagonist, as he dodges his 'employers'. This creates layers foreshadow; death and lynching, isn't it inevitable when tho [...]

    9. So COOL!!I love anything that has to do with black history--but add a Superman type character in the midst of 1927 tensions and you have something amazing!The art is flat out beautiful. It almost reminds me of Norman Rockwell paintings but on every page.I really hope that this mini-series expands into other arcs so we can explore more of where our Superman character came from and how he may change the lives of those living in Chatterlee, Mississippi.

    10. This first book in the series was really good. It definitely will leave you wanting to know what is going to happen in the next book. I thought the artwork was well done, too. I felt like the language and images were right on point with the times.I'm eagerly looking forward to the next book. Just a heads up: this is not a book for kids.

    11. It's kind of like black Superman. Pretty cool but short. I can't seem to find 2-4 unfortunately.Also, beautiful art.

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