The Dove and the Crow

The Dove and the Crow Meet the Crow He s been around for hundreds of years He took scalps in the time of Cortez and Columbus He skins men and makes rugs of their hides lassos of their intestines Right now he s angry and

  • Title: The Dove and the Crow
  • Author: Joseph Hirsch
  • ISBN: 9781942086031
  • Page: 201
  • Format: Paperback
  • Meet the Crow He s been around for hundreds of years He took scalps in the time of Cortez and Columbus He skins men and makes rugs of their hides, lassos of their intestines Right now he s angry, and out for blood Meet the Dove Matina s a whore at the Maison de Joie, with mojo than you can shake a stick at It s been said that, with just one bat of her eyelashesMeet the Crow He s been around for hundreds of years He took scalps in the time of Cortez and Columbus He skins men and makes rugs of their hides, lassos of their intestines Right now he s angry, and out for blood Meet the Dove Matina s a whore at the Maison de Joie, with mojo than you can shake a stick at It s been said that, with just one bat of her eyelashes, she can turn pennyroyal tea into tincture of opium Meet the Tracker Dognose Jones, the adopted son of a Cherokee medicine man, has a special gift He can smell his prey like a bloodhound scenting its chase Welcome to the Wild, Weird West Joseph Hirsch is scary good Jed Ayres, author of Peckerwood A writer of uncommon talent Tom Kakonis, author of Treasure Coast and Criss Cross

    One thought on “The Dove and the Crow”

    1. I received an e-copy of this book from Story Cartel for review purposes.Due to my attention span, it took me a hot second to get into this book. Once, I did it was really enjoyable. It takes place in a magical version of the US, around the time of the Civil War. Some people are able to do magical tasks, but it isn't easy. Sometimes it takes five years to learn one spell.A Native American named Crow is seeking out a whore called Matina aka the dove of the title. She is said to have more magic tha [...]

    2. Dove, an ancient and evil immortal, kidnaps Matina, a woman of ill repute whose magic is rumoured to exceed that of his own. But Dognose, a magical tracker, is on the scent to retrieve Matina from Dove’s clutches before the murderous creature adds her head to his growing collection.Set in a fantastical place and time, resembling the western and pacific coast of the USA in the mid 1800s, Hirsch weaves historical accuracies across the settings that establish surrealism. The violence and sexualit [...]

    3. Crow (human cannibal, decapitator, scalper, skinner) was on a mission to go to the Maison de Joie (whorehouse) & get Matina Stovis (aka Dove, Greek whore, psychic, healer, helper). He was also on the run. Mukki is Crow’s loyal 1/2-Indian servant, & sort-of adopted son.Dognose Jones (tracker, scent ability), Buffalo & Berdache (2-spirits) were in hot pursuit of Crow.Gracie (whore), Susy (whore), Nathan Klavier (blind piano player), & Kitty Kindesmord (Madame) also worked at the [...]

    4. My favorite Thomas Pynchon book is The Crying of Lot 49, a short, extremely complicated novel that preceded his more notable works. I have never, to this day, made it all the way through Gravity's Rainbow, and I am ever envious of those that can and understand it; The Crying of Lot 49 gave me a taste for the labyrinthian weirdness Pynchon was capable of on a level that I could understand.The Dove & The Crow I found to be a similar novel, not for any plot device or theme, but because I strong [...]

    5. This is a very well written tale. Beyond the frequent spots of what some readers may consider non-PC-ish vulgar language (I didn't mind, but I thought I'd mention it since it's quite prevalent) and the occasional ultra-violence there is an adventurous and meticulously crafted story full of interesting characters who find themselves in beautifully rendered locales. The writing is very strong, particularly in terms of character building and description of settings. This book reminds me of the dark [...]

    6. When you pick up a copy of Joseph Hirsch's works, you know it's going to be gory, you know it's going to be bloody, you know it's going to be good. Once again, he hasn't disappointed. There are scenes in this book that I probably shouldn't have read while on my lunch break, but I'm a butcher; I can handle the details of a man being skinned (even though I understand the process probably better than someone reading Joseph's books should have). There's a lot to love in this book, and I'm having a h [...]

    7. I'm starting to get into acid westerns more and more. This isn't exactly that genre, but it's close enough for me to really dig it, It isn't precisely surreal, more magical, but it brings cool shamanic power battles into the hard core grit of a western. It's more interesting than both straight westerns and straight magi stories, a hybrid that has the best of both. The writing is good too, a very solid and enjoyable read. Very nicely done.

    8. Having read several of Hirsch's books by now, I've started to notice some trends. What a delight in The Dove and the Crow to find that I barely knew this author at all! The writing style seems more mature and focused, and the subject is wholly different than anything of his I've read. The characters are a little trope-y but Hirsch throws in enough surprises that I found myself giggling and dancing around the house over them. It's a fast read, but its gonna be a re-read too.

    9. I have read a couple of books by Hirsch and they were good. This isbetter. The characters and the plot has stayed with me since I readit. Hirsch uses magic to evoke reality and I'm left with a feeling forthe time and sympathy for the characters.cially the women. Iliked it!

    10. Jean Cocteau once said words to the effect of "What the public criticizes in you, cultivate. It is you." My greatest weakness-strength as a writer is a tendency toward colorful, expressionistic descriptions. Some people see it as overwrought, while others see it as painterly. It certainly makes me somewhat of an anachronism in a world reshaped by everyone from Hemingway to Elmore Leonard, where "less is more," is the byword.Well, in "The Dove and the Crow," more is more, and I'm not only comfort [...]

    11. I received a free download of this book from Story Cartel, thank you!I have read other writings from this author, and I generally like the stories a lot. He writes well and has interesting ideas. This particular book was not a favorite. I liked the basic idea behind it, but it was a little gory and crass for my taste. Also, the ending left me with some unanswered questions.I adored Matina, because she brought the flowers and springtime everywhere she went. I especially liked how she created the [...]

    12. Abundant imagination here, with a truly odd group of characters. Easily my favorite was The Crow. The history that Hirsch creates for him and the awful things he does have much black humor to them, which is something I always enjoy. There's also a spaghetti-western aspect to the story, which also relies on black humor.The imagery is flashy, sometimes too much for its own good. The work is also overwritten at times (despite its short length) and could have used one more round of editing.

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