The Weave

The Weave The crew of the interstellar ship Mercator is making valuable discoveries in the Doradoran region but conflict is mounting between them and the inhabitants of hte Earthlike planet Cibola Xenologist C

  • Title: The Weave
  • Author: Nancy Jane Moore
  • ISBN: 9781619760076
  • Page: 100
  • Format: Paperback
  • The crew of the interstellar ship Mercator is making valuable discoveries in the Doradoran region, but conflict is mounting between them and the inhabitants of hte Earthlike planet Cibola Xenologist Caty Sanjuro knows Cibolans can stop human settlements on their planet, but her superiors think she s just gone native Sundown, a Cibolan astronomer, is working to keep the rThe crew of the interstellar ship Mercator is making valuable discoveries in the Doradoran region, but conflict is mounting between them and the inhabitants of hte Earthlike planet Cibola Xenologist Caty Sanjuro knows Cibolans can stop human settlements on their planet, but her superiors think she s just gone native Sundown, a Cibolan astronomer, is working to keep the resistance peaceful, but others see no reason for caution they have successfully fought off invaders in the past Despite the growing friendship between Sanjuro and Sundown, preventing war is looking and impossible.

    One thought on “The Weave”

    1. A solid science fiction novel filled with interesting women, The Weave caught me up from the start, and short of a slightly draggy data lumpish bit (setting up the parameters of the journey to the newly discovered planet with alien life) midway through the first third, kept accelerating steadily to the end. In the early chapters Moore foreshadows where this novel is going, which shifted the tension line from surprise to anticipation. The characterizations were strong enough, their various attitu [...]

    2. Earth finally sends a ship to explore another star, which has a planet that seems a prime candidate for colonization and lots of material wealth in the asteroids. But the planet is inhabited by a pre-industrial civilization of aliens with an incredible difference from us. One of the exploratory crew, both a marine and the only one trained in the principles of xenoanthropology, struggles not only with understanding these people, but with trying to protect them and maybe her crew, from them. The b [...]

    3. Have you ever looked up into the night sky and think I’m going to meet aliens some day. The book starts off with both the main human protagonist and the main alien protagonist looking up into their respective heavens and making this bold statement.The Weave is a first-contact story in which humans, wanting to exploit the much-needed resources of a system inhabited by aliens they assume are "primitive" and defenseless, discover their mistake the hard way. The story takes place in the 25th centu [...]

    4. This is a contemplative sci-fi novel, the kind that doesn't rush you through a never-ending action-cycle just for the sake of it --- although the story does build inexorably toward action as a group of flawed and human scientists, soldiers and explorers --- to my delight, many of them women --- struggle with first contact in ways that echo contemporary human socio-political struggles. The story of humanity's first encounter with the Cibolans, a race of telepaths, is a thoughtful examination of h [...]

    5. An interesting space fantasy with an alien world inhabited by telepathic beings both more primitive and more advanced than humans. What will happen when the humans come to take the resources of the "primitives" and ignore their telepathy? Will an agreement be reached?

    6. An excellent sociological/psychological story of alien/human interaction. Unique world building and character development with charm and gentle humor. I was delighted with this book and will anticipate reading others by this author.

    7. My review of The Weave by Nancy Jane Moore is up at SFRevu (sfrevu/php/Review-id.p). I called it an old-fashioned hard SF First Contact novel (although I did point out it was a bit too predictable).

    8. I liked this, although I thought it tailed off at the end. The plot was a bit predictable, and rounded up in an overly descriptive way that reduced the tension and the involvement of the characters.I enjoyed the alien world, the strong central woman character. Reminded me a lot of Ursula Le Guin. Will look out for her and would read more by her.

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