The Ash Burner

The Ash Burner In The Ash Burner a sensitive poignant novel about growing up running away and the many guises of love year old Ted lives with his father the local magistrate in the small coastal town of Li

  • Title: The Ash Burner
  • Author: Kári Gíslason
  • ISBN: 9781322523750
  • Page: 372
  • Format: ebook
  • In The Ash Burner, a sensitive, poignant novel about growing up, running away, and the many guises of love, 12 year old Ted lives with his father, the local magistrate, in the small coastal town of Lion s Head All Ted knows about his mother is that she died when he was a boy, and that his father despite moving halfway across the world to start anew still grieves for her pIn The Ash Burner, a sensitive, poignant novel about growing up, running away, and the many guises of love, 12 year old Ted lives with his father, the local magistrate, in the small coastal town of Lion s Head All Ted knows about his mother is that she died when he was a boy, and that his father despite moving halfway across the world to start anew still grieves for her privately When he is hospitalized after a swimming accident, Ted meets Anthony and Claire, and is immediately captivated by the older pair Intelligent and perspicacious, they introduce him to poetry and art, and he feels a sense of belonging at last But as the trio s friendship intensifies over the years, Ted must learn to negotiate the boundaries of love and come to terms with a legacy of secrets and silence.

    One thought on “The Ash Burner”

    1. A fantastic first novel from the author of the memoir 'The Promise of Iceland'. A well crafted story about growing up, growing apart, and finding yourself after losing someone you love. Gislason's prose is rich and engaging, and I found myself having to pause regularly to simply savour his turns of phrase. I loved the poetic feel to the narrative, and the sense of place that is a key element to Gislason's work.

    2. I found this laborious and unrealised. There's a kind of non-reciprocal love story that comes from nowhere and continues through nowhere to end up in nowhere. The writing is beautiful, but I found the story fundamentally unfulfilling.

    3. The mystery of the relationships between the main characters drew me into the story to search for the history that might reveal the reasons for what was said and unsaid. In the end the story was about following what you feel to be right rather than following what people ask of you. I enjoyed the writing and look forward to reading the author's book about finding his father in Iceland. Another search for truth

    4. From the first moment I opened page one of this book in a bookstore I knew I had to have it! The writing is so beautifully crafted, poetic in its descripton of the landscape and how it behaves as the characters move across and within it. Emotions are described in such a way that I often stopped at a sentence and turned it over in my mind, surprised at its perception and honesty. Unlike some other reviewers, I didn't feel a slowness of the unfolding story an irritant; rather, a gift that gently p [...]

    5. Fairly average. I can see what the author was trying to do but some paragraphs were convoluted and overly laden. I mean, I finished reading the book, so it wasn't that bad But it sits firmly in the middle of the bell curve for sure.

    6. "They'd both come to read their love as they read books: something you could collapse into while also remaining fundamentally alone."

    7. I found some unevenness about this story and the writing, but found too many things that chimed for me to dislike it. My daughter gave it to me and I thank her. As someone who loves swimming and the ocean, there was surprisingly no mention of Ted's loss with the decision for him not to swim, although I understand that his experience may have made it difficult to return to the sea. I do wonder how many times the word 'beauty' appears in the novel, but it did prompt me to think more on the notion [...]

    8. There's little light relief in this novel, concerned as it is with themes of loss, silence, possession and guilt (and there's more). No doubt this is valid from the experience of teenagers just moving into their adult years, but I felt such an emotional wallowing in the work.However. the author does explore the dynamics of need, possession and the subsuming of identity with an obvious competence. There's just so little to give balance and hope.The writing style endeavours to capture mood through [...]

    9. Quite haunting and beautifully written. Ted has been bought up by his father after his mother dies in England. They have moved to NSW and as he moves towards High School, Ted almost drowns and in hospital while he recovers he meets a slightly older Anthony and Claire. There the book moves towards the relationship between the three and their relationships with their parents. There is a lot of poetry, references to books and art. Also there is some Danish influences (from the author's background) [...]

    10. The first review for The Ash Burner:‘Kari Gislason’s first book, The Promise of Iceland is a fitting precursor to his first novel, The Ash Burner. The Ash Burner is an insightful coming-of-age novel featuring a protagonist who is infinitely appealing. It grounds itself firmly in the art world and will appeal to fans of Craig Silvey’s Jasper Jones, Emily Bitto’s The Strays and Krissy Kneen’s Steeplechase.’ Books+Publishing

    11. I guess I'm just not good with literary novels. I don't have that brain that enjoys the subtlety and the obscurity. I didn't mind this and I stuck it to the end but I do prefer something a bit meatier and easier. Sorry Kari.

    12. Sorry, you irresistible Icelandic dreamboat, but nahhhhh. Somewhere, somehow, you lost me there along the way. I don't even think listening to your lilting mellifluous tones reading this to me on audiobook would retain my already-short attention.Can you write another memoir, pls? I love those!!!!

    13. I couldn't finish this, painfully laborious. I used to have a view that if you started a book you should finish it - the older I get the less I can bother with that!

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