War and Peace in the Global Village

War and Peace in the Global Village Initiallly published in this text is regarded as a revolutionary work for its depiction of a planet made ever smaller by new technologies A mosaic of pointed insights and probes this text predi

  • Title: War and Peace in the Global Village
  • Author: Marshall McLuhan Quentin Fiore
  • ISBN: 9781584230748
  • Page: 483
  • Format: Paperback
  • Initiallly published in 1968, this text is regarded as a revolutionary work for its depiction of a planet made ever smaller by new technologies A mosaic of pointed insights and probes, this text predicts a world without centres or boundaries It illustrates how the electronic information travelling around the globe at the speed of light has eroded the rules of the linnearInitiallly published in 1968, this text is regarded as a revolutionary work for its depiction of a planet made ever smaller by new technologies A mosaic of pointed insights and probes, this text predicts a world without centres or boundaries It illustrates how the electronic information travelling around the globe at the speed of light has eroded the rules of the linnear, literate world No longer can there be fixed positions or goals.

    One thought on “War and Peace in the Global Village”

    1. You had me at "the computer is the LSD of the business world," Marshall, you had me at "the computer is the LSD of the business world."

    2. Interesting thoughts:There is a rather tenuous division between war as education and education as war. There is no question here of values. It is simple information technology being used by one community to reshape another one. It is this type of aggression that we exert on our own youngsters in what we call "education." We simply impose upon them the patterns that we find convenient to ourselves and consistent with the available technologies. Such customs and usages, of course, are always past- [...]

    3. McLuhan is somewhat cryptic, but his observations on the workings of media technology are incredibly insightful. In War and Peace in the Global Village McLuhan expands upon his study of how electronic media and technology shape our environment, and how we as individuals and as a species respond to these changes. He argues that because we are unaware of and not yet adapted to these changes brought about by our new electronic environment, we may unconsciously revert to tribal, instinctual, and eve [...]

    4. The funny thing about Marshall McLuhan is that whenever you read one of his chapters, you're never really sure just what he said - though he described it in a way that seems enlightened, meaningful and cogent to our times. I find myself falling back, re-reading the chapter again always feeling a bit off kilter. That said, War and Peace In the Global Village does one thing well - it makes you think - and think at a higher level about our culture, its future and its propensity for change. Cultural [...]

    5. The design of this book seems to be as important as the content. It features quotes from Finnegan's Wake in the margins and many images throughout, as well as varied typefaces and font sizes, landscape-oriented text, white text on black, etc. for emphasis. So it's definitely a book-as-object, not just agnostic "content" transferable to any medium. That said, the book feels very blog-like, perhaps because bloggers often make use of similar design elements. (WaPitGV is still meant to be read front [...]

    6. I picked this book up, along with Understanding Media (also by McLuhan) at a random book sale. I loved Understanding Media so I thought I would enjoy this one too. Instead, I barely understood it and thought it was wrong when I did understand it. I never really figured out what the authors' point was. There were interesting fragments of ideas, but there was something of a fundamental disconect between my understanding and what was on the page. That said, the book really has a great rhythm to it. [...]

    7. This little book, originally published in 1968, will be in my constant reading rotation. This publication has countless juxtapositions of James Joyce quotes and vintage ads and pictures within the margins that alone serve as a message within a message.I found this quoteon the publisher's website: "Interviewed by Playboy magazine a year after the book's release, McLuhan called our era a 'transitional era of profound pain and tragic identity quest.' 'But,' he added, 'the agony of our age is the la [...]

    8. Excellent book for anyone interested in technology, from a humanistic standpoint. McLuhan is perhaps the most aphoristic modern writer I've ever read, and the book is filled with lines like: "the computer is the LSD of the business world", and "the consequences of images are images of consequences". His style is playful, bombastic, sometimes apocalyptic, but always very literary. One of the books that got the young me, then a hopelessly philosophical liberal arts major, interested in computing.

    9. I'm still puzzling over this book, but after three or four times threw it, and considerable readings of the secondary scholarship, I am finally starting to make sense of it. I think it might have been McLuhan's attempt at his great attempt at a synthesizing work in the artistic mode, as he tries to write with Finnegans Wake, rather than about it. My reading notes can be found here: virtualpeacegarden/?q=node/4

    10. A brief analysis of Finnegan's Wake, Joyce's book about the impact of moveable type and other inventions, ones that altered different societies. According to McLuhan, Joyce was one of the greatest authors who ever lived. Using photos and quotes from Finnegan's Wake, McLuhan urges the reader to think about the impact of inventions, how they have made the world a global village. Amazing as it may seem, this book was written before the internet was invented.

    11. McLuhan, who coined the phrase "global village", really understood how technology can allow tribal cultures to catch up with modern societies without having the growing pains of an industrial revolution, etc. He referred directly to Russia and China, but the same is true in the middle east today.Also, he predicted that color TV (the book was written in '68) would make fast-moving, more visceral sports like skiing and soccer more popular in the US.

    12. Still processing. Obviously it's a little dated at this point, but a lot of the ideas are still very useful.

    13. Read it because of its status as a modern classic. I read it in Kandyla, Greece, on my way back to the States from the Middle East, and I liked it. I intend to read it again.

    14. there are some cool pictures in here and lots of finnegans wake quotes. a fun little prescient time capsule

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