The Life of an Ordinary Woman

The Life of an Ordinary Woman In Anne Ellis readers will discover the perfect blend of the ordinary and the extraordinary a pioneer who like the most valued of friends is a woman of wry wit plain courage keen perceptions Mol

  • Title: The Life of an Ordinary Woman
  • Author: Anne Ellis Lucy Fitch Perkins Robert Bly
  • ISBN: 9780395957837
  • Page: 121
  • Format: Paperback
  • In Anne Ellis, readers will discover the perfect blend of the ordinary and the extraordinary, a pioneer who, like the most valued of friends, is a woman of wry wit, plain courage, keen perceptions Molly Gloss Powerfully conjuring up the world of the mining camps and the colorful communities of the central Rocky Mountains, Ellis interweaves an invaluable history of theIn Anne Ellis, readers will discover the perfect blend of the ordinary and the extraordinary, a pioneer who, like the most valued of friends, is a woman of wry wit, plain courage, keen perceptions Molly Gloss Powerfully conjuring up the world of the mining camps and the colorful communities of the central Rocky Mountains, Ellis interweaves an invaluable history of the nineteenth century American West with a valiant personal tale.

    One thought on “The Life of an Ordinary Woman”

    1. I am very drawn to autobiographies/memoirs written long ago by people who never achieved celebrity for their work. These are usually not the 'mommy dearest' confessional memoirs but stories about real people and how real people actually lived back when. I came upon this book on the bio shelf at the library while looking for something else; it was a serendipitous find. Anne Ellis, born to an illiterate, strong, courageous, adventurous mother around 1880, writes about growing up in mining camps in [...]

    2. I liked this, not because it was excellent writing (because it was not), but for the fact that it gave a you a true account, from a woman's perspective, what it was like in old Colorado mining camps in the late 1880's.

    3. For what it was, I thought it was outstanding. Ellis jumps around a bit, and sometimes each paragraph is like a new chapter, but it is the most real thing I've ever read about the time period (late 19th early 20th century). The little details are what makes it so great. It's not some grand lofty thing. You get a really clear view of what life was like for a (very poor) woman of that time in the mining camps. Well, maybe that sounds kind of boring set out like that, but it just wasn't. Also, she [...]

    4. This is a truly beautiful and authentic first-person work about the life of Anne Ellis, a woman who grew up during the 1880s in the Colorado mining camps. She writes mostly in the present tense, adding a sense that the reader is there with her.While her experiences are vividly written, she jumps around so much that I couldn't really get sucked into the narrative, and I ended up not finishing the book. Still, I think it is more than worth a try as she has a unique voice (an introduction explains [...]

    5. "When we come to the train, I feel I am really seeing life. This little narrow-gauge train, consisting of a dinkey engine and two spitty, dusty cars, seems lovely to me."
The book is an honest recording of insights and experiences not only of one woman but of a period of time and place, that of 19th century Colorado mining camps.

    6. It's been at least 16 years since i read this book. I barely remember the plot line but i do remember devouring this book and loving it. I should add that i was going though what i refer to as my "pioneer" phase where all i wanted to do was get into a covered wagon with a couple of oxen, head west and live in a log cabin. I'm still heading west

    7. A remarkable story of a remarkable woman who lives in Colorado during the laying of railroad track and telegraph wire. Courageous story of how she survived alone in the midst of the male-dominated 19th century west.

    8. I read this to learn more about the history of the Bonanza area - I'm working on mine reclamation there - and it turned out to be extraordinarily well written. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I recommend this to anyone interested in the life of mining families in the gold rush days.

    9. Anne Ellis grew up in the same Colorado mining town as my great grandparents. She gives a terrific sense of what life was like in the mid to late 1800's and even mentions them in her book.

    10. Once I got used to the way it was written - since it seems it was a spoken memoir - I really loved it! What a life!

    11. Authentic, idiosyncratic, page-turner. It's right up your alley if you like intrepid women who don't whine about stuff you couldn't put up with for ten minutes. I love her.

    12. This was a stunning book, it was so real and raw that it was heartwrenching. I strongly recommend this book to anyone, but to be prepared for a very raw experience.

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