Black Wolves

Black Wolves For readers of Brent Weeks and fans of Netflix s Marco Polo comes a rich and inspired fantasy tale of warriors and nobles who must take the most desperate gamble of all awaken allies destructive than

  • Title: Black Wolves
  • Author: Kate Elliott
  • ISBN: 9780316368698
  • Page: 235
  • Format: Paperback
  • For readers of Brent Weeks and fans of Netflix s Marco Polo comes a rich and inspired fantasy tale of warriors and nobles who must take the most desperate gamble of all awaken allies destructive than the hated king they hope to overthrow Kate Elliott s new trilogy is an unmissable treat for epic fantasy lovers everywhere.An exiled captain returns to help the son ofFor readers of Brent Weeks and fans of Netflix s Marco Polo comes a rich and inspired fantasy tale of warriors and nobles who must take the most desperate gamble of all awaken allies destructive than the hated king they hope to overthrow Kate Elliott s new trilogy is an unmissable treat for epic fantasy lovers everywhere.An exiled captain returns to help the son of the king who died under his protection in this rich and multi layered first book in an action packed new series.Twenty two years have passed since Kellas, once Captain of the legendary Black Wolves, lost his King and with him his honor With the King murdered and the Black Wolves disbanded, Kellas lives as an exile far from the palace he once guarded with his life.Until Marshal Dannarah, sister to the dead King, comes to him with a plea rejoin the palace guard and save her nephew, King Jehosh, before he meets his father s fate.Combining the best of Shogun and Netflix s Marco Polo, Black Wolves is an unmissable treat for epic fantasy lovers everywhere.

    One thought on “Black Wolves”

    1. 4.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum bibliosanctum/2015/12/07/bKate Elliott is on fire this fall with the release of this first novel of a new series, set in the same world as her celebrated Crossroads trilogy. What can I say, but Black Wolves is a sweeping masterpiece that will leave fantasy readers spellbound. Coming in at nearly 800 pages–all jam-packed with richness and beauty–this epic novel sank its talons in me and kept me enthralled for days on end until I finished it. No question abo [...]

    2. Copy provided by publisherIf I’m not certain I’ll want to read a book, I jump right into reviews, even go for spoilers if I’m extra unsure. But if I know I’m going to read a book, I avoid all mentions except pub date.So it was with Black Wolves. I opened this book having no idea what it was about, only that it was a Kate Elliott epic fantasy. What I expect from a Kate Elliott book is interesting worldbuilding, interesting women as well as men, and a complex storyline with the kind of emo [...]

    3. This book was 780 pages in the ARC I poured into my eyeholes because Kate Elliott writes long books full of feelings and description of foods and the inner lives of women and excellent, complicated politics in shades of gray. And friends, I now wish I could unread ALL 780 PAGES so I could immediately pour them directly back in through a fresh reread. If you know how I read epic fantasy (with a notebook and pen and a page of notes for almost every character because they're so long/big I get easil [...]

    4. I blurbed this book:"On a vast, colorful canvas, Kate Elliott has drawn dozens of characters who act and react with poetry and grit. Lush and textured, by turns moving, exciting, playful, and contemplative, BLACK WOLVES is a masterpiece that soars with an epic soul."You're truly in for a treat. This is wondrous.

    5. An Asian-inspired epic fantasy with a huge cast of characters and exploring generational social and political upheaval.The Hundred is a small and largely coastal area north of the hug Sirinakian Empire and relatively recently saved from warring demons by a nobleman from the Empire who has set himself up as King of the Hundred. We get an introduction to Captain Kellas as he gets assigned to be the head of the King's son's personal guard as well as the King's daughter Dannarah who desperately want [...]

    6. For most of the book I loved it, the characters and the world were rich quite a few times I was on the edge of my seat. One scene in particular had me raging at one of the characters.The book started dragging for me in the third (?) act and never really picked up again. It wasn't boring or dull but it wasn't "good" either.What I liked/loved:SaraiKellasDannarahthe Reeves and EaglesDifferent creatures/cultures/peoples of the HundredWhat bothered me/didn't like:The time jump from when Kellas was yo [...]

    7. Review from The Speculative Herald: speculativeherald/2015Black Wolves may be a daunting read as it is a massive book and I know sometimes readers are deterred by that. The thing is, though, it is also a massively impressive book. Scaling it down would be a disservice to the story and quite honestly the story deserves to be read. I have not formulated my ‘best of the year’ list, but I can tell you this book will appear on it as it is easily one of the best epic fantasies I have read recently [...]

    8. One of the better epic fantasies you'll read this year. Also, the protagonists are senior citizens, which is fantastically awesome.

    9. Kate Elliott never fails me. She consistently writes fun, thoughtful, original fantasy, featuring diverse and interesting characters of both genders, and set in complex, textured worlds. This book is no exception. It must be said, however, that the beginnings of her series are consistently and painfully dull; I was about 200 pages into this one before it convinced me.Black Wolves is the first novel in a new epic fantasy series set in the world of the Hundred, which also featured in the Crossroad [...]

    10. But whatever Jehosh might be, he did not have his grandfather's brutal possessive streak, the will to prevent anyone else from tasting a nectar he wanted to keep for himself.Jehosh loved the pursuit.His grandfather desired control.Atani had carved a different path for himself, cut short far too soon.Kate Elliott is the supreme ruler of fantasy (yes, even better than Melina Marchetta, blasphemous though that may be). George R. R. Martin has nothing on this. Nothing.Elliott has this way of creatin [...]

    11. After letting this sit for almost two weekswell. Still dunno what to make of it.But whatever Jehosh might be, he did not have his grandfather's brutal possessive streak, the will to prevent anyone else from tasting a nectar he wanted to keep for himself.Jehosh loved the pursuit.His grandfather desired control.Atani had carved a different path for himself, cut short far too soon.For some reason, I loved parts like this. The legacy of personalities is something I find endlessly, hopelessly, eterna [...]

    12. Normally I love Kate Elliott. The worldbuilding is incredible, the characters tend to be shades of grey rather than all good/all bad, and she always has strong, independent female characters with minds of their own.And all of that is here too, along with a variety of characters spanning decades, a key plot point unfolding from multiple viewpoints - each of which seems to be the truth and perfectly reasonable - and showing the long-term effects of a conquered land, along with inhabitants, culture [...]

    13. Probably the most intriguing epic fantasy world since Nevèrÿon. I’m definitely still a fan of the quest/heroic battles/grimdark/etc types of fantasy novels that are recommended and celebrated, but there’s something about the way Elliott plays with power and change and culture in Black Wolves. Like Nevèrÿon, and The Grace of Kings (released earlier this year), Black Wolves is challenging the traditional ideas and scope of epic fantasy. I’ve seen folks calling this the best fantasy novel [...]

    14. Mea culpa: I haven't read anything written by Kate Elliott in over two decades. This is long overdue, I know. And I have no excuse. I read the Jaran books back in the day, but nothing else since. I have bought every single Crown of Stars installment as soon as they came out, yet I decided not to start reading the series until it was complete. Did the same thing with the Crossroads trilogy. So yes, I should have at least read King's Dragon and its sequels a long time ago. But for some reason, som [...]

    15. Review courtesy of Dark Faerie TalesQuick & Dirty: Eagles, demons, and an epic game of thrones, will Kellas and Dannarah figure out who killed King Atari before King Jehosh loses his throne?Opening Sentence: “The whole business stank of rotting fish.”The Review:Dannarah, Kellas, Sarai and Lifka are the four major point of views throughout this novel. Dannarah is a reeve (eagle rider), she used to be the Chief Marshal until her nephew, the King, relieved her. Kellas used to be the Captain [...]

    16. Once the beloved captain of the King’s Black Wolves, Captain Kellas retired in disgrace and wants nothing more to do with court politics–but when the king summons him to his palace and involves him in a feud between his two wives, Kellas feels duty-bound to step in. Dannarah, the great-aunt of the current king, is a reeve, bonded to a giant eagle and entrusted with watching over the land; but all is not well in the reeves’ halls… Sarai is a member of a rich but distrusted minority; disgr [...]

    17. Black Wolves does something pretty bold in the beginning. In the first ~90 pages we get Atani, Dannarah, Anjihosh and Kellas as our main characters. They're well-fleshed, dynamic, interesting and compelling. Other secondary characters appear and provoke intrigues, revelations and other actions that promise a lot of tension and conflict later. Atani and Dannarah are great siblings, complementing each other very well. Kellas is also great, the spy/assassin member/secret leader of the deadly Black [...]

    18. This book is a murder mystery at the heart of a political thriller wrapped up in an epic fantasy setting. It's been decades since Commander Anji saved the Hundred from the internal conflict that ravaged it's people by killing the demons responsible and bringing the chaotic political factions to heel under his strong hand. Now his grandson is king and conflict is again brewing; the first stirrings of a succession war are beginning to surface in the palace, and there is unrest in the population as [...]

    19. BLACK WOLVES felt like a modern spin on epic fantasy, if that makes sense – still very recognisably epic fantasy, but with refreshingly different takes on the more traditional fantasy tropes. I loved Elliott's variety of protagonists (including two older POV characters, one male and one female), though the multiple POVs did make me feel slightly distanced from the characters. I also liked how different cultures and backgrounds were deftly interwoven into the story, making the world feel like a [...]

    20. Not giving this one a rating as I didn't even get halfway. I can hardly believe I am reading the same book as everyone else looking at all the glowing reviews. Reminds me of watching an Asian movie with a really bad dubbed translation. The language and writing just felt weird in so many different places that it was too much of a struggle for me to immerse myself in the story. And then the story jumps about forty years into the future and almost the entire cast of characters up to that point are [...]

    21. I really enjoyed this and am looking forward to reading book two. The only reason that I can't give this five stars is that it took about 150 pages for me to start loving the story, but it will still go on my favorite reads list because when it grabbed me it kept me wrapped up until the very last page. Full review to come.

    22. Puts the epic in epic fantasy! I could have used more action and less court intrigue, but otherwise this world is awesome, the characters are diverse and lovely, and the magic is fascinating. Can't wait to find out what happens next!

    23. More like 3.5 stars, although I was gripped and I loved it (and yet all my tiny complaints are about to get lodged below, this is not really a review, these are my personal reflections and an expression of suffering ;))I feel like I need a comfort read after this (why hasn't the new Courtney Milan come out yet?!) Not really what I expected. While it's definitely got signature Kate Elliott's touches, it was also immensely difficult to read for me, to the point of putting it down repeatedly becaus [...]

    24. This book is everything I hoped that it was going to be and more. Most of the events of Black Wolves are set about 60 years after the end of events in the Crossroads Trilogy. Kate says that you don't need to have read Crossroads in order to understand what's going on in Black Wolves, and while I think that's certainly accurate, and you can and should absolutely take the author at her word, I think you're doing yourself a disservice if you don't read Crossroads first. There's a ton of socio-polit [...]

    25. Let the rating read 4.5This book came as a surprise. The scope and complexity of the plot were an order of magnitude greater than what I had imagined either from the blurb (which is totally inaccurate) as well as the initial chapters. Kate Elliott has gotten quite a few things right in this book. She has constructed a very interesting and varied cast of characters, she has built a complex, layered and interesting world, she tells her fascinating story through an intricate and detailed plot - but [...]

    26. I’ve been putting off writing a review for Black Wolves for over six months, because every time I sit down to write it, all I can think of is saying: ‘Just read it already and thank me later.’ And that’s not much of a proper review, is it? I love Kate Elliott’s writing. It is rich, smart, and features people we usually don’t get to see being the hero. Whether it’s Dannarah and Kellis, who are past their youth, but still powerful, or Sarai and Lifka, young women who are both Other i [...]

    27. Lacks an Editor, racist caricatures/stereotypes, female characters using their sexuality to ultimately manipulate the men (because that's where the ~*~*real*~*~ power lies)In a strange mimicry of what the author seems to believe Asian people speak, they have strange sensei-like affectations and garrulous grammatical errors in a terrible buffet of verbosity, peppered with astute banalities ("He had strong arms.")I couldn't finish this after encountering a brazenly ripped-off version of the animal [...]

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