There's a War to Be Won: The United States Army in World War II

There s a War to Be Won The United States Army in World War II THERE S A WAR TO BE WON is the landmark story of one of the greatest armies in history a conscript force of amateur soldiers who had an unparalleled record of combat success Here for the first time i

  • Title: There's a War to Be Won: The United States Army in World War II
  • Author: Geoffrey Perrett Geoffrey Perret
  • ISBN: 9780394578316
  • Page: 383
  • Format: Hardcover
  • THERE S A WAR TO BE WON is the landmark story of one of the greatest armies in history, a conscript force of amateur soldiers who had an unparalleled record of combat success Here for the first time in one volume is the chronicle of the United States Army s dramatic mobilization and stunning march to victory in World War II.In a lively and engrossing narrative thatTHERE S A WAR TO BE WON is the landmark story of one of the greatest armies in history, a conscript force of amateur soldiers who had an unparalleled record of combat success Here for the first time in one volume is the chronicle of the United States Army s dramatic mobilization and stunning march to victory in World War II.In a lively and engrossing narrative that spans theaters of operations around the world, Geoffrey Perret tells how the Army was drafted, trained, organized, armed, and led at every stage of the war Beginning with the prescient military planners of the 1930s, he offers vivid warts and all profiles of the farsighted commanders who would lead the way, men like Marshall, MacArthur, Eisenhower, Ridgway, Bradley, and Patton.Drawing heavily on important new source material in major archives throughout the United States, THERE S A WAR TO BE WON offers new insights into the wartime Army, its commanders, and its battles A major work of American military history An immensely readable, well researched history Dramatic Chicago TribuneFrom the Paperback edition.

    One thought on “There's a War to Be Won: The United States Army in World War II”

    1. On top of his superhuman logistic, military-industrial management skills, George Marshall also gets a thumbs up for sucessfully dealing with Montgomery and the wounded pride of the British. That wounded pride came with quite a bit of nastiness, at times devious, at others hilariously balls-out (like the time, just after the German surrender, when the British realized they couldn't feed their agreed-on 50% of POWs; they had also agreed to transfer to the Americans thousands of Austrian horses, wh [...]

    2. I've had this book for years, I finally dusted it off and cracked it open. I was ready to put it down with the first King Kong chest pounding about the military but was surprised how it was informative it was about logistics and backstory information. I always liked to see the process and not just the icing on the cake. I'm not sure the last time I read a book about WW2, or any war for that matter. There was even a chapter what the process is when a person is killed. That should be a Must Read f [...]

    3. I was very impressed with this book. It was highly rated in Dunnigan’s The World War II Bookshelf. I thought Old Soldiers Never Die (biography of MacArthur) also by Perrot was well written. Thus getting this book was a sure bet and I was not disappointed.At West Point in the early 80’s, I took a great military history course covering WW1 and WW2 warfare. I still have those well written course texts. However, this book actually gave me some better history lessons than that course.I think the [...]

    4. The book is a well written and informative examination of the history of the U.S. Army in World War II. It begins with a summary of the history of the army between the two world wars, and ends with the defeat of Japan in 1945 (with a short coda that analyzes why it was the best army in the world by the end of the war). The book is at its best when it looks at the elements of the army's World War II history that the conventional military histories do not treat: how the army was trained, equipped, [...]

    5. Perret offers a first-rate history of what went into the shaping of the U.S. Army in the Second World War. What was fascinating to learn was that, as late as 1940, the U.S. Army was ranked below that of Portugal. Through reading this book, the reader sees how it was through the foresight of people like George C. Marshall and other fine soldiers such as Matthew Ridgway, Maxwell Taylor, Bradley, Eisenhower, and Patton, that the U.S. was able to develop, by 1944 and 1945, one of the finest armies i [...]

    6. Excellent summary of the American Army's war effort in the Second World War, broken down into logical chapters, Prose is dense and scholarly but not impenetrable in the tradition of British military writing. A nice mix of personality study, logistical overview, and bottom-up viewpoints.

    7. Here is a full attempt at a history of the US Army in the 30s and WWII. I have a love hate relationship with this book. When its talking about the American Army, its primary focus, its a very good fact filled charming read. When it come to politics or discussions of other WWII armies, it can devolve into a childish -out of left field- series of jingoistic screeds dissing anything non-GI. His bizarre animus against the British army and its leading officers can get old fast. But overall, since the [...]

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