A Land Gone Lonesome: An Inland Voyage Along the Yukon River

A Land Gone Lonesome An Inland Voyage Along the Yukon River In his square sterned canoe Alaskan author Dan O Neill set off from Dawson Yukon Territory onetime site of the Klondike gold rush to trace the majestic Yukon River His journey downriver to Circle

  • Title: A Land Gone Lonesome: An Inland Voyage Along the Yukon River
  • Author: Dan O'Neill
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 381
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • In his square sterned canoe, Alaskan author Dan O Neill set off from Dawson, Yukon Territory, onetime site of the Klondike gold rush, to trace the majestic Yukon River His journey downriver to Circle City, Alaska, is an expedition into the history of the river and its land, and a record of the inimitable and little known inhabitants of the region With the distinct perspeIn his square sterned canoe, Alaskan author Dan O Neill set off from Dawson, Yukon Territory, onetime site of the Klondike gold rush, to trace the majestic Yukon River His journey downriver to Circle City, Alaska, is an expedition into the history of the river and its land, and a record of the inimitable and little known inhabitants of the region With the distinct perspective of an insider, A Land Gone Lonesome gives us an intelligent, rhapsodic and ultimately, probably the last portrait of the Yukon and its authentic inhabitants.

    One thought on “A Land Gone Lonesome: An Inland Voyage Along the Yukon River”

    1. O'Neill's book is part float trip travelogue, part prosopographical study of the Yukon river people, and part history. But more than than all this, it is a eulogy or sorts for a way of life that not only is dying, but is being ushered to the grave by an overzealous National Park Service that wants to cut people out of the landscape. O'Neill recognizes the complex interconnectedness of traditions among the few remaining subsistence homesteaders; upset the precariously balanced economic system by, [...]

    2. Bought this book in a thrift store in Eureka, Montana for .75 USD: worth every penny. It covers a boat trip from Dawson City, Yukon, to Circle Alaska along the Yukon River. It is mostly about the various people and abandoned buildings along the River rather than natural or geologic history. The anecdotes are just the right length to provide the level of detail needed without being long winded.There is also some commentary about how the (US) National Parks Service has been managing a large portio [...]

    3. Interesting travelogue/history book about the author who takes a canoe trip from Dawson in the Yukon Territory along the Yukon River to Circle City, Alaska. Along the way he chronicles the history of the Klondike Gold Rush and tells the tales of many homesteaders in the region, from the miners and trappers of the early twentieth century to the "back to the landers" of the 1960s and '70s. He interviews many colorful folk and gives a lot of background color, including the story of the half-crazy g [...]

    4. I've just cracked this book, but the first few pages have me hooked. It reminds me of the summer I spent living in Dawson City in a tent, about 4 Kms outside of town. Everything else is on hold until I finish this.O'Neill will challenge the myth that Parks services are "the good guys" in this book who, rather than preserve a way of life, bungle constantly and dismiss the historical significance of subsistence-living along the Yukon River. This book inspires me to begin my own ethnographic voyage [...]

    5. Excellent read!Ahh, the unintended consequences of self perpetuating bureaucracy. Alaska is different. Her parks and protected areas should be as well. Great narrative, incredible characters, and a harrowing bear attack. Sad that my generation will be the last to witness people of this mettle- who are able to engage in a true subsistence lifestyle that requires the tenacity and character described in these pages.

    6. A Land Gone Lonesome is an amazing look at the Yukon. It is in one sense a follow up to John McPhee's Coming Into the Country, but it stands on its own as a story. I do recommend reading Coming Into the Country first, to get the "snapshot in time" feel of McPhee's Alaska. The contrast it provides when compared with the lonesome land of Alaska after having lost it's rogue's gallery that populated McPhee's Country is that much more potent.

    7. When I finished it, I wrote "A whiny guy travels the length of the Yukon.". Other than that I have no memory of it

    8. An authentic story written by a well-known author with first-hand knowledge of the issues of interior Alaska. Dan happens to be a friend who quotes Fred Andersen on page 122!

    9. Fascinating read about life on the Yukon River and how it has changed. And really awesome to read about friends I know that live on the Yukon just outside Eagle.

    10. I enjoyed this book. I kayaked from Eagle to Circle with friends this summer so it was great to read the book before our trip. Lots of great history about the area.

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