Words and Music

Words and Music The play takes place in what Katharine Worth describes as an unidentified listening space another of Beckett s skullscapes The only specific location mentioned is the tower perhaps a folly so the sce

  • Title: Words and Music
  • Author: Samuel Beckett
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 247
  • Format: None
  • The play takes place in what Katharine Worth describes as an unidentified listening space, another of Beckett s skullscapes The only specific location mentioned is the tower perhaps a folly so the scene may well be in a castle with Croak in the role of ch telain.Croak is a doddery old man, testy and maudlin He is never referred to by name in the play itself bThe play takes place in what Katharine Worth describes as an unidentified listening space, another of Beckett s skullscapes The only specific location mentioned is the tower perhaps a folly so the scene may well be in a castle with Croak in the role of ch telain.Croak is a doddery old man, testy and maudlin He is never referred to by name in the play itself but he is well named Joe addresses to him albeit somewhat obsequiously as, My Lord, since, despite his apparent frailty, he has plainly been someone used to wielding authority There are only two sound effects used in the entire play, the scuffle of Croak s feet as he arrives and departs and the thud of his club reminiscent of the rulers wielded by the Animator in Rough for Radio II and the music teacher in Embers For entertainment, this Beckettian old King Cole has only two old stalwarts left to call on, his minstrels, Joe Words and Bob Music.

    One thought on “Words and Music”

    1. Very difficult to understand and inspires me to listen to its recording, as that is likely the proper way to experience it. However, it is an extremely unique and even funny in some parts. Any Beckett fan interested will probably find this text at least mildly fascinating.

    2. Pure Beckett - words and discordant music fighting for our attention. The main voice is that of Croak - another of Beckett's disembodied voices.The theme Croak opts on for the evening’s diversion is love. He is a decrepit version of Orsino with his famous opening line from Twelfth Night: "If music be the food of love, play on," a hopeless romantic, in love with love, and melancholy from the mere thought of it. Croak could almost be the selfsame man, had he never moved from that spot for the re [...]

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