On the Road Bike: The Search For a Nation’s Cycling Soul

On the Road Bike The Search For a Nation s Cycling Soul Ned Boulting has noticed something It s to do with bikes They re everywhere And so are their riders Some of these riders seem to be sporting sideburns and a few of them are winning things Big things N

  • Title: On the Road Bike: The Search For a Nation’s Cycling Soul
  • Author: Ned Boulting
  • ISBN: 9781448161096
  • Page: 170
  • Format: ebook
  • Ned Boulting has noticed something It s to do with bikes They re everywhere And so are their riders Some of these riders seem to be sporting sideburns and a few of them are winning things Big things Now Ned wants to know how on earth it came to this And what, exactly is this.In On the Road Bike, Ned Boulting asks how Britain became so obsessed with cycling Ned sNed Boulting has noticed something It s to do with bikes They re everywhere And so are their riders Some of these riders seem to be sporting sideburns and a few of them are winning things Big things Now Ned wants to know how on earth it came to this And what, exactly is this.In On the Road Bike, Ned Boulting asks how Britain became so obsessed with cycling Ned s search puts him in contact with some of the wonderful and wonderfully idiosyncratic people who have contributed to this nation s two wheeled history It s a journey that takes him from the velodrome at Herne Hill to the Tour of Britain at Stoke on Trent via Bradley Wiggins, Chris Boardman, David Millar and David s mum , Ken Livingstone, both Tommy Godwins, Gary Kemp yes, him from Spandau Ballet and many, many The result is an amusing and personal exploration of the austere, nutty soul of British cycling.

    One thought on “On the Road Bike: The Search For a Nation’s Cycling Soul”

    1. Firstly, this book was released as "On the Road Bike"-I assume the "Yellow Jumpers for Goalposts" title was dropped quite late on (in fact there is a clue that choosing a title may have been a struggle between Ned and his editor in the acknowledgements section if you look carefully). For what it's worth I think the initial title was the better one, and it provided a clearer link back to his previous book, "How I Won the Yellow Jumper".In fact, I found "Yellow Jumper" a great book, honest, funny [...]

    2. Not sure how he manages to be modest, articulate and on many levels an impressive person (in terms of his foreign language skills) but still dead annoying!Decent book about some of men's cycling's unsung heroes along with his own experiences. Probably should have spoke more about Beryl Burton, Victoria Pendleton et al and maybe if he's written it a few years later would have had bit on Lizzie Armitstead.

    3. Enoyable, easy to read book, broken in to discreet chapters each about various cycling "names" from the British cycling community - it's not the usual Wiggins / Cav etc, but a much more varied selection and for me, this is what makes the book interesting. It's written in Boultings usual jovial style and makes you feel like you are along for the ride.

    4. As a reader new to Ned Boulting I really enjoyed this book. Ned's prose is easily consumed, as if he was just chatting away in front of you.There are lots of laugh-out-loud moments, emotive scenes, and you'll get that knowing grin as Ned serves up in such engaging paragraphs how those who love two wheels feel in a society that prefers 4.Highly recommended for cycling fans.

    5. I'm intrigued and bemused by the way cycling's taken off in Britain, and enjoyed his 'Yellow Jumper' book about the Tour de France, so this jumped out at me from a library shelf.I was expecting observations and musings about British cyclists, MAMILs and the like. Those do come, eventually - but I was pleasantly surprised by what came first: absorbing and quite moving interviews and explorations of some of the characters and little-known greats of the sport. And I appreciate the way Ned Boulting [...]

    6. This is the sequel to Boulting's 'How I Won the Yellow Jumper' (see my review ) which I devoured and loved. What is it? It's not really the story of how we came to win the Tour de France and quickly rise as a cycling power as a nation over the last few years. It's not a systematic history of British cycling either. It's the account of a number of our cycling greats - a say number because it is in no ways complete and looks often into either those who are alive and forgotten by the mainstream or [...]

    7. Ned Boulting, a sports journalist, describes the history of cycling culture in Britain from his perspective as an enthusiastic amateur. He does this mostly through telling the tales of past and present cyclists and as most of the past ones are largely unknown outside of the cycling world, there are many tales of unsung heroes and hardship.Because the book focusses on the experiences of the individual sportsmen rather than give a linear history, the book can feel a bit episodic and lacking in coh [...]

    8. A surprising, funny and moving book about British cycling history and culture from an author whose everyman approach to the material makes it accessible to people who don't know their peloton from their elbow.Boulting's day job as a sports presenter and journalist equips him to convey the eccentricity of the international and domestic cycling scenes hilariously, but his skill as a writer is in the way that he tells us about forgotten heroes, unknown but valuable contributors to the growth in pop [...]

    9. Absolute fantastic read! Written by Tour correspondent Ned Boulting who move s away fro the tour to look at a nations obsession with getting on the bike! The author has been a correspondent on the tour for the last ten years or has he puts it from "Armstrong's drug fuelled jihad to British dominance", here he puts the tour behind him and looks at earlier British triumphs to the amateur cycling scene in the UK. Written as a series of small interesting chapters and anecdotes form racing on the con [...]

    10. Given the bumbling nature of Ned's previous book, and I suspect the man himself, this was rather an ambitiously titled book, but somehow, incredibly, with the usual stop-offs for chaos, disaster and misunderstandings he just about managed to pull it off. He clearly loses the thread of story within a chapter. However, bouncing from one obsessed middle-aged man (and they're pretty much all men), to another septuagenarian eccentric via his own inept cycling performances, Ned manages to stumble on t [...]

    11. I found this a funny and moving book about British cycling history and culture from an author whose writing makes the subject accessible to people who don't know it intimately. His skill lies in the way that he tells of forgotten heroes, valuable contributors to the growth in popularity of cycling in the UK and ordinary people with a connection to the sport. If you've come to love cycling by watching (or reading about) Wiggins and Froome this book can give you a sense of the grass-roots scene wh [...]

    12. A pleasant read - really, it feels like a coffee table book, that you can pick up and read a chapter of, and then return to at will - there's no real thread or narrative that you need to follow, each chapter is pretty standalone. Ned has a very likeable writing manner, it feels like a friend is having a conversation with you, and you really do "bond" with him as he goes through each chapter. Each chapter carries its own interest, but what holds back this book from being rated higher is that lack [...]

    13. saya membeli ebook ini [juga kebayakan ebook saya] dari knol dot pwi terbeli ketika pengen nyari tulisan-tulisan tentang kontribusi bersepeda pada kehidupan kota.buku ini bercerita tentang orang-orang [warga kota] yang punya pengalaman dengan sepedanya. khususnya orang-orang inggris, tempat buku dan penulisnya ini tinggalpanya bukan ini yang cocok buat kebutuhan saya. mungkin kali lain buku ini ada gunanya. hehe---

    14. I like Ned. His casual easy style of writing is easy to read and often amusing. This book's primary subject is the way cycling has grown as a curious sport populated by odd outsiders to a popular sport headlined by the 'Wiggo effect'.This book is ultimately interesting and often amusing but lacks a little punch and drive. I doubt those without interest in our sport would find it that compelling.

    15. Ned Boulting continues his wry look at all things cycling. Having dissected the Tour in his previous book, 'How I won the Yellow Jumper' he goes on to so the same with Cycling as a whole in Britain. He finds it to be ever so slightly risible and preposterous but also somehow noble in its tenacity.A genuinely laugh out loud read.

    16. Enjoyable read, although it would benefit from being told in a more chronological order, from when Ned started to now, instead it jumps about between unrelated stories and in and out from first person to third.That aside a very good book.

    17. Ok i am trying to get back into biking and this is a book about cycling. But most of Ned's stories never caught my attention.

    18. I enjoyed this as much as I did 'Yellow jumper' and I half expected this to be the 'difficult' dull second book. Sorry ned, I wrongly under estimated

    19. Witty and highly entertaing tales from Ned, who set off to discover more about some of our great cycling heritage.

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