Firefly

Firefly On a secluded hillside in Jamaica lies Firefly No l Coward s peaceful retreat Here between sundowners and sunsets brandies and cigarettes the seventy year old Coward whiles away his days a comfort

  • Title: Firefly
  • Author: Janette Jenkins
  • ISBN: 9781609451400
  • Page: 341
  • Format: Paperback
  • On a secluded hillside in Jamaica lies Firefly, No l Coward s peaceful retreat Here, between sundowners and sunsets, brandies and cigarettes, the seventy year old Coward whiles away his days a comforting, frustrating pattern of unwanted breakfasts, reluctant walks, graceless dips in the pool in the company of his manservant Patrice Set over a series of summer daysOn a secluded hillside in Jamaica lies Firefly, No l Coward s peaceful retreat Here, between sundowners and sunsets, brandies and cigarettes, the seventy year old Coward whiles away his days a comforting, frustrating pattern of unwanted breakfasts, reluctant walks, graceless dips in the pool in the company of his manservant Patrice Set over a series of summer days in the early 1970s, Firefly flits through Coward s dreams and memories, his successes and regrets, against a sultry, seductive backdrop of blue skies and glistening water Colorful and contemplative, this is a moving portrait of old age and friendship, and a poignant appraisal of a life well lived.

    One thought on “Firefly”

    1. Interesting imagining of Noel Coward's later life, in which he drifts between his apparently miserable existence - although it is, at least, warm - in his Jamaican home, and dreams of earlier, healthier, happier times. It is a melancholy book, and it certainly does not picture old age as any kind of picnic.Of course I have nits to pick. At one point the author has Coward use the phrase "new-age quacks". The book takes place in 1971, a little bit before the term "new-age" would have been used so [...]

    2. Brilliant idea, disappointing in delivery. Fictional account of the last few months of Noel Coward's life. The ageing grandee sits poolside in the shade of his Jamaican retreat (Firefly), knocking back the G and Ts, chats with the houseboy and recalls his life. Coward had such an interesting life, and his Plays, behind all the wit over cocktails, are so full of tortured emotion - that there should be mileage enough for a hell of book. Jenkins can write, and it's a readable enough novella, but yo [...]

    3. "Firefly" is a reason to be happy that local, independent bookstores continue to exist. And perhaps the reason that they do. I picked it off a table of recommendations by staff because I'd never heard of the author, because the end of Noel Coward's life seemed like unlikely subject matter, and because the publisher wasn't one I knew well. I wanted something unfamiliar to me."Firefly" is a little gem of a novel, about Noel Coward's last couple of week's at him Jamaican retreat, which is eponymous [...]

    4. "Firefly" has some charming passages and achieves a nice effect in portraying the sad final years of one of the great entertainers of the mid twentieth century. I wonder though if the author's goals in writing the book were perhaps excessively modest. "Firefly" is really a novella, and it could be that it falls uneasily between the concision of a short story and the complexity of a longer novel.It also concerns me somewhat that the book fits too easily into a cultural pattern that has been been [...]

    5. brilliant this dramatised or fictional account of Noel Cowerd's declining years living at his small villa in Jamaica is by turns funny , witty and sad . Raather like his near neighbour and close friend Iain Fleming the house that he had built was small and very plain but with a wonderful location .Cowers is being looked after by a young manservant who dreams of going to the bright lights and glsmour of London and the contrast between his naive dreams and Noel Cowerds sophisticated weary cynicism [...]

    6. OK, not everyone is going to care about Noel Coward's last days on Firefly, his Jamaican estate. But if you do, this is a beautiful fictional account, complete with flashbacks, and enough name-dropping to delight the star-struck.Attended only by his long-time and presumably long-suffering servants, he receives old friends as well as unwanted visitors while drifting in and out of consciousness between London & US in the 30's and 40's, and the present 70's on the island. Jamaica has its indepe [...]

    7. Added 1/25/14.I learned about this book via an article in the NYTimes:nytimes/2014/01/26/booThe NY Times lead-in description says: "Janette Jenkins imagines Noël Coward’s last years."I've always loved the work of Noel Coward. He was a fascinating individual. Very clever with words.Here's the page where you can "look inside" the book:amazon/gp/product/1609

    8. Noël Coward spent his last years, at Firefly, his home in Jamaica, where he died of a heart attack at 73 in the early 1970s. In the novel, Noel Coward has no energy or appetite. He spends much of his time sleeping and reminiscing about the old days. His servant Patrice wants to work at the Ritz in London and wants a recommendation from Noel. The dialogue between Noel and Patrice is fun. I enjoyed the book and the flashbacks but the book would have been more interesting if I knew more about Noel [...]

    9. I was hoping to like this more although I couldn't tell you what I was expecting. It is at its essence about a wealthy older man at the end of his life pretty much alone except for the people he hires to take care of him. The fact that he's Noel Coward doesn't seem to make a whole lot of difference.

    10. Immeasurably sad Imagine a depleted Noel Coward. Physically frail. Artistically spent. Dependent on the kindness of servants. All as a vehicle to introduce the captivating character Patrice. Almost cruel, I would say. Cannot recommend.

    11. It was OK, but it lacked dramatic tension and seemed strongly influenced by "Father of Frankenstein." The Noel Coward in this book is angry and petulant and unattractive. It had its moments, but they are few and far between.

    12. A melancholy tale about Noel Coward, toward the end of his life, reflecting on all the fabulous times he had in life. The time slips between past and present were mainly in dreams, but overall it was entertaining.

    13. A very quick and glossed over account of Noel Coward's last days and I would've preferred more flashbacks to his life, but I suppose that is what a biography is for.

    14. I was too young for this book, but the melancholy of a great man's twilight years was easy to relate to - although far away in time and space.

    15. A true-feeling story. Watching Noel Coward decline, after getting the feeling of what his life was like before the decline through flashbacks was not easy, but it was rewarding.

    16. I found it interestingmetimes humorous but mostly sad because I so loved the young, very talented, vibrant, singing, dancing, acting Noel Coward.

    17. Pleasant enough, but not having a strong prior interest in Noel Coward, it probably wasn't as captivating to me as it seemingly is for others.

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