Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture

Saints and Symposiasts The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco Roman and Early Christian Culture Greek traditions of writing about food and the symposium had a long and rich afterlife in the first to fifth centuries CE in both Greco Roman and early Christian culture This book provides an account

  • Title: Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture
  • Author: Jason König
  • ISBN: 9781139557900
  • Page: 347
  • Format: ebook
  • Greek traditions of writing about food and the symposium had a long and rich afterlife in the first to fifth centuries CE, in both Greco Roman and early Christian culture This book provides an account of the history of the table talk tradition, derived from Plato s Symposium and other classical texts, focusing among other writers on Plutarch, Athenaeus, Methodius and MacrGreek traditions of writing about food and the symposium had a long and rich afterlife in the first to fifth centuries CE, in both Greco Roman and early Christian culture This book provides an account of the history of the table talk tradition, derived from Plato s Symposium and other classical texts, focusing among other writers on Plutarch, Athenaeus, Methodius and Macrobius It also deals with the representation of transgressive, degraded, eccentric types of eating and drinking in Greco Roman and early Christian prose narrative texts, focusing especially on the Letters of Alciphron, the Greek and Roman novels, especially Apuleius, the Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles and the early saints lives It argues that writing about consumption and conversation continued to matter these works communicated distinctive ideas about how to talk and how to think, distinctive models of the relationship between past and present, distinctive and often destabilising visions of identity and holiness.

    One thought on “Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture”

    1. Averil Cameron's recent question of "Can Christians do Dialogue?" is indicative of a growing interest in considering Christianity's historically awkward or neglectful relationship with dialogue. Jason König is timely in his discussion of late antique dialogic literature, proposing an extension of the study of sympotic literature well beyond Athenaeus. König explores the capacity of the sympotic form and language to indicate and/or challenge social class, form identity, and engage with/draw in [...]

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