D for Deception

D for Deception Before Ian Fleming there was Dennis Wheatley A best selling spy novelist at the outset of World War II Wheatley became a master of deception for Great Britain turning pulp fiction fantasies into rea

  • Title: D for Deception
  • Author: Tina Rosenberg
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 310
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Before Ian Fleming there was Dennis Wheatley A best selling spy novelist at the outset of World War II, Wheatley became a master of deception for Great Britain, turning pulp fiction fantasies into real life espionage Pulitzer Prize winning author Tina Rosenberg tells the amazing true story of one man who applied the plots of his own novels to the battlefield and changedBefore Ian Fleming there was Dennis Wheatley A best selling spy novelist at the outset of World War II, Wheatley became a master of deception for Great Britain, turning pulp fiction fantasies into real life espionage Pulitzer Prize winning author Tina Rosenberg tells the amazing true story of one man who applied the plots of his own novels to the battlefield and changed the course of history.

    One thought on “D for Deception”

    1. This is a Kindle single (short and only $2). Totally worth the read. I'm a fan of spy stuff; especially real spy stuff. This is the story of a spy writer in England who was recruited to devise stories that were leaked to the Germans in order to confuse them into allocating resources to the wrong places. It was short and sweet - I would have enjoyed this being a longer book, but I'll take what I can get!

    2. The premise is fascinating: best-selling UK pulp novelist Dennis Wheatley gets pulled into the war office during WWII to help Churchill and his generals think like the Germans and comes up with some crazy capers to formulate plans of military deception. The only problem is the book (booklet?) is written with about as much passion and suspense as a article. For $2 I can't complain too much, but this is the least thrilling account you'll ever read.

    3. This is a must-read for every lover of WWII tactical history. Much of Britain's war tactics depended on deception and misdirection, especially D-Day plans. Without their deceptive practices, Germany's war machine might have defeated the Allies in 1944.

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