Lazy Bastardism

Lazy Bastardism If grown ups don t read poetry writes poet and critic Carmine Starnino it s not because they have a bone to pick with poets The truth is even intolerable they prefer not to They re just not that in

  • Title: Lazy Bastardism
  • Author: Carmine Starnino
  • ISBN: 9781554471188
  • Page: 433
  • Format: Paperback
  • If grown ups don t read poetry , writes poet and critic Carmine Starnino, it s not because they have a bone to pick with poets The truth is even intolerable they prefer not to They re just not that into us In his latest collection of critical essays, Starnino reports on the state of poetry with his usual sleeves rolled up approach to literary criticism whic If grown ups don t read poetry , writes poet and critic Carmine Starnino, it s not because they have a bone to pick with poets The truth is even intolerable they prefer not to They re just not that into us In his latest collection of critical essays, Starnino reports on the state of poetry with his usual sleeves rolled up approach to literary criticism which synthesizes broad observation with close reading Engaging both icons Atwood, Birney, McKay, Moritz, bpNichol and lesser knowns James Denoon, Anne Szumigalski, Peter Trower , Starnino writes with the style, wit and intensity of a poet critic, offering confident, intelligent candour where we have too often settled for bland, much recycled truisms.

    One thought on “Lazy Bastardism”

    1. Let me begin by telling you how I came to this book - the third out of three books of Canadian poetry criticism I've read all at once. The first was James Pollock's You Are Here, the second was Robyn Sarah's Little Eurekas, and Carmine Starnino's Lazy Bastardism rounds out the trilogy. The thing is, around the internet poetry blogs, and even in the other two books, Starnino's name comes up a lot. I approached this book with a little sense of awe, that I was coming to the "big one", the important [...]

    2. More three-and-a-half stars, really.Sharp-minded, tough, aphoristic, engaged, opinionated - all qualities needed in a good critic. Drawbacks? (Not his fault that poetry isn't my preferred reading material.) Lack of geniality, as well as a bit of stiffness regarding his own writing. There is a certain humourlessness that puts me off; more wit than humour here, and over the course of a collection of essays (on canadian poets and poetry) that can be tiresome. But certainly well worth reading.

    3. Galvanic. I don't quite understand why lucid, well-argued criticism like this should make me want to write poetry myself, but I'm not fighting the impulse.

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