Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism

Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism Woodrow Wilson is best known for his service as the twenty eighth president of the United States and his influence on American foreign policy in the twentieth century and beyond Yet Wilson is equally

  • Title: Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism
  • Author: Ronald J. Pestritto
  • ISBN: 9780742515178
  • Page: 296
  • Format: Paperback
  • Woodrow Wilson is best known for his service as the twenty eighth president of the United States and his influence on American foreign policy in the twentieth century and beyond Yet Wilson is equally important for his influence on how Americans think about their Constitution and principles of government Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism highlights Wilson Woodrow Wilson is best known for his service as the twenty eighth president of the United States and his influence on American foreign policy in the twentieth century and beyond Yet Wilson is equally important for his influence on how Americans think about their Constitution and principles of government Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism highlights Wilson s sharp departure from the traditional principles of American government, most notably the Constitution Ronald J Pestritto persuasively argues that Wilson s unfailing criticism places him clearly in line with the Progressives assault on the original principles of American constitutionalism Drawing primarily from early writings and speeches that Wilson made during his years as a scholar, Pestritto examines the future president s clear and consistent ideologies that laid the foundation for later actions taken as a public leader Engaging and thought provoking, Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism gets to the heart of Wilson s political ideologies and brings a fresh perspective to the study of American political development.

    One thought on “Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism”

    1. Much of the factual information here I was already aware of. For example I knew (from earlier reading) that Wilson was a part of the progressive movement rather than being a Jeffersonian as he's often presented (or thought of). The extent however of his disagreement with that branch of political thinking (having not been written on much since) was a slight surprise to me.For example (from Wilson's writing, the book has extensive end notes for each chapter) Wilson totally dismissed the first two [...]

    2. Did you ever notice how modern progressives constantly want to change or do away with the Constitution and Bill Of Rights? From the electoral college to gun rights, they have zero respect for the Constitution. Why?To understand the roots of the problem you have to understand that the beliefs of Hegel had swept our intellectuals from the mid 1800's on and by the time Wilson went to University, it was the dominant belief in colleges and universities here as it also is in Europe and Asia. To this d [...]

    3. This is a great book. It is not necessarily a light read, but for a scholarly work, it is very readable. I disliked Wilson even more after reading it. His research is meticulous. I did a review earlier this year at whatwouldthefoundersthink here.

    4. This is another one of those books that you love because you learn the real story but hate because of the ideals and character of the individual. Woodrow Wilson and those who follow him have ruined the United States and unfortunately, the People have let them do it. Wilson believed that the most efficient means of governing was to have a lifetime appointed executive who oversaw lifetime positions for Subject Matter Experts (SME) who would be able to produce the right policies in all aspects of s [...]

    5. Pestritto does an amazing job making the evil of Woodrow Wilson come to life. History determined the form of government per Wilson, and his opinion was that we'd grown beyond that moldy Constitution & needed a man of principle to rule based on what it was we wanted & needed. Of course orators would convince us what we wanted. What happened to our government while we were busy raising families and learning to use the new gadgets.

    6. This is my second book by this author. I liked this book and the author, but would only use it as a primer/base to study the ineffectual and dangerous administration of this president. To truly understand all the "accomplishments" of Woodrow Wilson, one would have to go more indepth.

    7. I finished the book and found it to be interesting, if not easy reading. it was well sourced and the addition of Wilson's letters were interesting. I would recommend it to a history buff or someone just wanting to understand our former presidents.

    8. I think this is actually a good and timely book that may have a lot to compare and perhaps reveal about the current trend toward liberalism and into a perilous future, but the dry, textbook-like delivery and Anglocentric view makes it hard to recommend this to a reader today.

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